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OLD IS GOLD, we want new opera with all old stuff

  • @niransha

    You want old Opera 12 bugs in new Opera? OMG. No!
    Its hard enough to report bugs, which may be fixed in months, years or never (thats true!) for current painmaker Opera 20.

    Opera 20 is ugly, has nasty bugs preventing me from using on website with logins (bad passwort manager, non-working password fill on webpages with Auth Basic). Bad debugging of Websites with WebInspector, and so on...

    Stay with Opera 12 as long as you can.

  • @niransha
    You want old Opera 12 bugs in new Opera? OMG. No!
    Its hard enough to report bugs, which may be fixed in months, years or never (thats true!) for current painmaker Opera 20.
    Opera 20 is ugly, has nasty bugs preventing me from using on website with logins (bad passwort manager, non-working password fill on webpages with Auth Basic). Bad debugging of Websites with WebInspector, and so on...
    Stay with Opera 12 as long as you can.

    I find it not that bad.:-)

    Why not using the LastPass-Extension??? It works fine and reliable.

  • @albatros48

    Why not using the LastPass-Extension??? It works fine and reliable.

    Because i need a account at LastPass' servers.
    Because i dont want to host my passwords on external servers from US companies with weak data security and privacy.
    Because i dont want to pay yearly for "extra" functionality to Lastpass.

    And ... (may be you laught at me) because a broeser's password manager has to work!

  • @albatros48

    Why not using the LastPass-Extension??? It works fine and reliable.

    Because i need a account at LastPass' servers.
    Right, but where is here the problem?
    Because i dont want to host my passwords on external servers from US companies with weak data security and privacy.
    I totally agree with you! That's my concern also, but I didn't find any better. Even KeePass was not satisfying for me.
    Because i dont want to pay yearly for "extra" functionality to Lastpass.
    It's free! I didn't pay anything for, as I didn't need the Premium-Function.
    And ... (may be you laught at me) because a broeser's password manager has to work!
    Well, I use ist now since years and it never failed.:-)

  • Lastpass a few years ago had one (and only one) incursion in which one of their servers "appeared" compromised which it turned out that it was not. In its years of operation there has never been a loss of passwords which is something most sites cannot lay claim to. As far as I'm concerned, LP is perfectly safe (about as safe as anything stored on one's own PC) and I have no qualms about using its services.

  • Lastpass a few years ago had one (and only one) incursion in which one of their servers "appeared" compromised which it turned out that it was not. In its years of operation there has never been a loss of passwords which is something most sites cannot lay claim to. As far as I'm concerned, LP is perfectly safe (about as safe as anything stored on one's own PC) and I have no qualms about using its services.

    Well, there is one point, which bothers me: I live in Germany and according to the experience with US-Procedures (NSA, outspying of data etc.). it makes me a headache, as the LastPass-Servers are certainly in the USA and I do not trust their security.
    But, according to my findings there is currently no better password control system im place and therefore I will have to live with.

  • I'm hopeful that the revelations regarding the NSA have raised alarms and that any future attempts at spying will be far more difficult. It wouldn't surprise me if the same sort of thing occurs in other countries which have yet to be discovered but that's anyone's guess. I seriously doubt the NSA would be concerned about passwords anyway. In all probability key trigger words would be caught on their radar but again... who can say? The most important sites (banking and purchasing sites) are in my memory and not on any server or machine. As for what I do store on LP's servers, they're simply passwords of little consequence and don't concern me in the least.

  • I'm guessing the main complaints about new Opera are with the lack of features because Opera themselves have said they needed to switch to a new engine as the old one was far too time consuming to maintain and hindered any innovation - that and the major rendering issues. The fact that it uses the same engine as Chrome means there's a strong likelihood that major companies sites will be compatible. Opera simply would not be here now if they hadn't made the change. I'm confident the front end will grow in a completely different direction to Chrome.

    For me this is the first Opera in a long time I can actually use. Sites now render correctly and there are enough features to keep me happily browsing whilst patiently waiting for new ones.

  • I completely agree with you, cozza. Nice to read a positive and factual post relating to the new browser. I'm hopeful new features will continue to attract a broader user base.

  • Finally a really useful and informative comment in a long time... not.

    Wonder what part of that recent 1.23% from 3% user base is so hard to grasp.

    Soon you will be the only guys talking, to themselves, around here but that's not a problem since you like it so much.

    Au revoir!

  • Lastpass a few years ago had one (and only one) incursion in which one of their servers "appeared" compromised which it turned out that it was not. In its years of operation there has never been a loss of passwords which is something most sites cannot lay claim to. As far as I'm concerned, LP is perfectly safe (about as safe as anything stored on one's own PC) and I have no qualms about using its services.

    Well, there is one point, which bothers me: I live in Germany and according to the experience with US-Procedures (NSA, outspying of data etc.). it makes me a headache, as the LastPass-Servers are certainly in the USA and I do not trust their security.
    But, according to my findings there is currently no better password control system im place and therefore I will have to live with.

    Life can be full of tough choices. One of them is how to keep secret things... uhmm... secret. Each time a secret "thing" is passed to someone else, it drags in an entire galaxy of potential problems. To name just a few:

    • how trustworthy is the new custodian
    • how trusworthy is the method of transferring a copy of the "thing" to him and retrieving it later
    • how trustworthy are his storage methods
    • how trustworthy are his internal handling mechanisms and personnel
    • how trustworthy will all of it be tomorrow (if he sells his organization or comes under new local legal/political constraints where he has his operations - or where he may have moved them after you entrusted him with your secrets).

    Only you can decide where the "sweet spot" lies between paranoia and total insecurity, for you and what you're trying to protect (which includes not just the passwords, but the contents of whatever they're accessing). Just be aware that passwords to online accounts and such are not the only (or perhaps even greatest) concern if you're truly worried about "them" watching or snooping. Your Internet traffic patterns, the data traffic itself, and the integrity of your own computer/software are all up for grabs if an attacker is sufficiently motivated and possesses adequate resources (including quid-pro-quo agreements with other attackers).

    Since your online behavior is already largely "on the grid", for most users' online passwords, there isn't that much additional risk contributed by storing them online with a reasonably secure site like LastPass. On the other hand, if there is indeed a password that you absolutely, positively cannot allow to be intercepted or betrayed, then you should never entrust it to anything associated with a publicly-accessible network like the Internet.

  • I liked the old Opera (presto) on this password feature because your password data was kept on your computer. They had the wand feature, and it worked pretty well, and looked great.. I am concerned about a password manager in cyberspace. In the US we had that Target breach where myriads of users had credit card and other information stolen. I'm hoping that Opera 20 improves what it provides -- does more to duplicate what it had in versions of Opera Presto.. I can't believe this is a Blink versus Presto issue. If people want to use a password manager in the cloud somewhere, fine. But it would be nice if Opera offered more than it currently does for those who want their password data kept secure on their computer.

  • I liked the old Opera (presto) on this password feature because your password data was kept on your computer.

    It hasn't changed, the password are still kept on the user's computer.

    I can't believe this is a Blink versus Presto issue. If people want to use a password manager in the cloud somewhere, fine. But it would be nice if Opera offered more than it currently does for those who want their password data kept secure on their computer.

    And what more should be offered by the password manager?

  • Old is not gold (and in truth... it never was as attested to by 3% market share). Old is simply... old.It no longer renders many sites properly and is becoming increasingly questionable in terms of security. I know we have been told that security patches would be offered and nothing to the contrary has been posted since, but we also know that no development of the browser suite is forthcoming and one has to wonder when the security patches will cease. No, old is not gold.

  • I'm guessing the main complaints about new Opera are with the lack of features because Opera themselves have said they needed to switch to a new engine as the old one was far too time consuming to maintain and hindered any innovation - that and the major rendering issues. The fact that it uses the same engine as Chrome means there's a strong likelihood that major companies sites will be compatible. Opera simply would not be here now if they hadn't made the change. I'm confident the front end will grow in a completely different direction to Chrome.
    For me this is the first Opera in a long time I can actually use. Sites now render correctly and there are enough features to keep me happily browsing whilst patiently waiting for new ones.

    Old is not gold (and in truth... it never was as attested to by 3% market share). Old is simply... old.It no longer renders many sites properly and is becoming increasingly questionable in terms of security. I know we have been told that security patches would be offered and nothing to the contrary has been posted since, but we also know that no development of the browser suite is forthcoming and one has to wonder when the security patches will cease. No, old is not gold.
    .>

    I agree with both of you. The old Opera was getting rusty, I mean is was not with the new browsing technology. If Opera ASA had continued to use Presto, it would get more and more incompatible with new technology.

  • And what exactly sets this Webkit browser apart from the rest? What makes it special? What makes it different? Because it just looks like Chromium with a couple of built-in extensions and a theme. Why even bother? And the quality of the extensions can't even compare to those on Chrome Web Store, let alone Firefox Addons. This is a huge mistake.

  • Old is not gold (and in truth... it never was as attested to by 3% market share). Old is simply... old.It no longer renders many sites properly and is becoming increasingly questionable in terms of security. I know we have been told that security patches would be offered and nothing to the contrary has been posted since, but we also know that no development of the browser suite is forthcoming and one has to wonder when the security patches will cease. No, old is not gold.

    Perhaps, but to justify change, it has to be BETTER.

  • Here's why I like it:

    It's faster and more compatible than the former versions with today's websites. It's still under development so there is more to come. It has speed dial and stash both of which set it apart from Google Chrome. I do not trust Google nor do I appreciate their cavalier attitude regarding my privacy. I do not appreciate Mozilla's regard for freedom of speech (i.e. the forcing of Branden Eich from his CEO position). Opera does what I need so I'm very happy with it.

  • From what I've read here we can't have Opera with all the old stuff, not a side bar like Presto's anyway, but for now we still have Presto, It has a few problems but it always had, it did when I started using it. The new Opera is OK for basic browsing, nothing special to mark it out in my opinion but that's the way its turned out. If there's functions you need best thing is to try and find them somewhere else as Opera Blink, it being in development, they might be a long time in coming.

  • "And what more should be offered by the password manager?"

    The password manager in Chropera isn't as good as the one in Opera. You can't save multiple logins for the same site. The wand in Opera does more than just saving usernames and passwords. Also, it's a simple 1 click login directly from the taskbar.

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