Opera 64-bit

  • Does anyone know if there's an Opera 64-bit version somewhere? The official website seems to love installing the 32-bit. I tried looking for one on the web, but although i managed to find one, it was an outdated version of Opera.

  • There is no 64bits version at the moment.

  • Nor are they really needed. The only real advantage of a 64-bit build is it allows a single process to access more than 4 gigs of memory. Since Opera now has everything split off into its own process the likelihood of you needing more than 4 gigs of RAM for a single process is extremely unlikely.

  • @lando242 64-bit brings more speed, security and stability to Chromium-based browsers like Opera:
    http://blog.chromium.org/2014/06/try-out-new-64-bit-windows-canary-and.html

  • Half of that post is spin, especially the bit about stability. Programs don't crash because they are 32 bit. They crash because something is doing something it shouldn't. Being 32 or 64 bits has no impact on that just like having a V8 vs a strait 4 in your car doesn't make you a better driver.

  • In another post they said "Stability measurements from people opted into our Canary, Dev and Beta 64-bit channels confirm that 64-bit rendering engines are almost twice as stable as 32-bit engines when handling typical web content."

    I know the devs are probably to blame. But the fact is the better stability is statistical.

  • But the fact is the better stability is statistical.

    Its not a statistic that has any effect on the end result. If you had two groups tasking a test, one with black ink pens and one with blue ink pens and one group scored better than the other, would it be because of the pens? Unlikely. Their 64 bit build was more reliable than the 32 bit build, not because it was 64 bit, but because it was better programmed.

  • Their 64 bit build was more reliable than the 32 bit build, not because it was 64 bit, but because it was better programmed.

    Nope. "Stability measurements from people opted into our Canary, Dev and Beta 64-bit channels confirm that 64-bit rendering engines are almost twice as stable as 32-bit engines when handling typical web content."
    That means the same exact versions/builds on Canary/Dev/Beta 64-bit reported less crashes than the 32-bit one. That's how I read it and I imagine that's logically correct.

    So, you're willing to accept the 64-bit one is better programmed, has factually better security and speed and stability but it's "not really needed"?

  • Don't repeat yourself, Raf. On my system I find the 64-bit versions better (especially faster; I can't really claim any difference in stability - anything that has crashed one has crashed the other). But anything statistical is subject to error.

    Unless people are using the two builds in the same way on comparable equipment, there is no meaningful way to compare them via statistics. Do they exclude 32-bit platforms from their analysis? Since you can't run 64-bit programs on 32-bit systems they should be ignored. Is it more likely for people with high-end systems to use 64-bit programs? The amount of RAM, better graphics and better processors may all effect stability of software. Unless they control for these factors, the statistics might not mean anything.

  • You know why it can be "factually better security and speed and stability"? Because it may be better programmed. Bit rating does not effect the security of your applications, code quality does. Bit rating does not effect the stability of your programs, code quality does. Bit rating can effect the speed of your programs but in a very minor way for things like web browsers. Its much more likely they have written more efficient code. You know what bit rating does effect? Memory access.

    I can easily accept that their 64-bit encoder is better programmed than their 32-bit one. They have a more experienced team that has already built and maintained one renderer and is now making an improved one. Building on what came before and all that. Is it because its 64-bit? No. Thats not how bit ratings work. Its not a magic bullet that makes programs better. The early 64-bit versions of Windows show that clearly enough.

  • Is it because its 64-bit? No.

    Anyways, the fact is the 64-bit version of Chromium is better than the 32-bit one. Don't users deserve the best from Opera?

  • Is it because its 64-bit? No.

    Anyways, the fact is the 64-bit version of Chromium is better than the 32-bit one. Don't users deserve the best from Opera?

    The developers are willing to make the 64bit version? I am not saying they can't do it, I am asking if they want.

  • The developers are willing to make the 64bit version? I am not saying they can't do it, I am asking if they want.

    I guess they will release a 64 bits version at some point but it's not something top priority for them as you can use the 32 bits version on a 64 bits system.

    Also, a 64 bits version would bring issues also like lack of plugins, among others.

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