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Is it impossible to install earlier version of Opera?

  • Opera 34 wasn't working with my Win XP system -- "Page crashed", "Page crashed", "Page crashed" -- so I downloaded the Opera 26 installer to try. Unfortunately Opera 26 has autoupdate turned on so it downloads and becomes Opera 34 upon opening. Even if I install Opera 26 from the installer file with no internet connection it opens immediately upon installation and tries to autoupdate. If I then close it, and trash opera_autoupdate.exe, frustrating the update, Opera 26 is thereafter broken. Maybe I can practice closing it quicker. Has it come to that? Is there no decent way to install a recent but not latest version of Opera?

  • Disconnect from the ibternet, install Opera, rename the auto update file, connect again.

    I guess it may work.

  • No, that was what I tried.

  • No, that was what I tried.

    You need to download the full installer.

  • Try adding the Autoupdate URL to Hostfile

    "autoupdate": "https://autoupdate.geo.opera.com/",

  • @ zalex108 - can you expand on your idea?
    Do you mean the text file called "hosts" in C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc?
    In my Win XP that file requires adding the IP address and the host name.
    What do you expect those additions to do?

  • That will block Opera from auto-updating.

  • @ zalex108 - can you expand on your idea?
    Do you mean the text file called "hosts" in C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc?
    In my Win XP that file requires adding the IP address and the host name.
    What do you expect those additions to do?

    In the Windows hosts file, a blocked entry listing will appear on its own line of the file in the form of:

    0.0.0.0 adsite.abcd.com

    or

    127.0.0.1 adsite.abcd.com

    (where adsite.abcd.com is instead replaced by the URL of the site domain you wish to block)

    The computer itself uses the hosts file to redirect any traffic that seeks to go to the listed URLs to instead route to either a nonexistent IP address or a harmless internal destination, thereby blocking the computer's Internet access of a listed URL. Either 0.0.0.0 or 127.0.0.1 will work to block the listed URL. If you periodically use a custom hosts-file source (like MVPS, etc) to heavily populate your hosts file, note that you may need to re-add any custom changes you yourself have made like this after the periodic hosts-file update.

  • I wonder if - after deciding to force autoupdate on users by removing any option to choose when to update - Opera will also address all these hacks meant to disable autoupdate, in order to neutralize them (hacks that are usually done in order to be able to continue using Opera instead of having to switch to other browsers, ironic huh ?).

    Opera is the only software product I ever heard of that offers no control whatsoever on the update process and forces the users to resort to hacks against the product.

    @dcouzin, more hacks are described here.

  • ...
    Opera is the only software product I ever heard of that offers no control whatsoever on the update process and forces the users to resort to hacks against the product. ...

    You apparently have never heard of Windows 10, non-enterprise versions. But I do agree with your underlying point that ALL software products ought to, by design, make provision for accessible user settings to block product updates. Only users themselves can determine their need for system/software stability and usage-continuity that are too often upset by various software updates, and they believe their needs should over-ride any software maker's desire for forcing auto-updates - even security updates. Unfortunately, the trend to forced auto-updating is becoming more widespread, rather than the opposite. It's my opinion that at some point this will not turn out well for many users and their systems.

  • Yes, I heard of Windows 10, maybe you meant that I never heard that it offers no control whatsoever on the update process.
    But regardless of your choice of tone, is that what you wanted to imply ?

    If yes, it would mean that f.ex. this Microsoft documentation titled Choose how updates are installed only applies to enterprise versions and Microsoft didn't specify that; that would be surprising, but you seem to know a lot about Windows 10 so it's probably so. But even if that turns out to be true, it wouldn't change much, unless you can mention at least a couple of mainstream software products that behave like Opera.

  • If you don't like it, don't use it. Instructions on how to block it have been posted in many locations. People crying about it have also been posted in many locations. The Opera team has heard all the arguments before and have decided to keep going in this direction. So either deal with it or change browsers. They are plenty of other options out there and no one needs to argue the same points all over again. Just read one of the many other threads about this if you want that malarkey.

  • In the past I was able to make an 'original' install of '30' series OPERA, as in for a Reformat, and if I was fast enough, I unplugged the Ethernet cable from my computer before auto-update could execute. Not sure if that will work TODAY, but I have done it.

    As for defeating auto-update, I have Sandboxie installed in my computers and have found that auto-update cannot work through the sandbox. In fact, the Sandboxie people suggest Un-Sandboxing OPERA {also F/F and Chrome} doing your update [assuming you want to], Re-force the browser in Sandboxie and be on your way. I expect to stay on OPERA 34 until something makes me curious about 35... or 36.

  • Yes, I heard of Windows 10, maybe you meant that I never heard that it offers no control whatsoever on the update process. But regardless of your choice of tone, is that what you wanted to imply? If yes, it would mean that f.ex. this Microsoft documentation titled Choose how updates are installed only applies to enterprise versions and Microsoft didn't specify that; that would be surprising, but you seem to know a lot about Windows 10 so it's probably so. But even if that turns out to be true, it wouldn't change much, unless you can mention at least a couple of mainstream software products that behave like Opera.

    Your earlier post stated "Opera is the only software product..."; I was merely pointing out that Opera is by no means the ONLY product offering no control of the updating process, and I used what I intended as a dry-humor phrasing for that (but perhaps that humor was lost in the process). Unless I'm mistaken, there are also one or two free antivirus products out there that now also fall within the same category as Windows 10.

    Regarding Windows 10, only the Enterprise version allows users any real control of Windows updating, mainly because it doesn't contain the Windows Update module that most of us are used to, but instead uses WSUS or other corporate-IT updating mechanisms that offer fine-grain control of how updating is handled within corporate networks. The consumer versions of Windows 10, which are what most ordinary users will ever encounter, have no internal capability to block updating; at most, the user can only temporarily defer a given update attempt for a short time-span.

    Because of the capacity of complex updates to crash a system when (not if) the updates are faulty or a system has various compatibility oddities and because forced updating can often take over usage of the system on the updater's own schedule or timing, I am (and will remain) philosophically opposed to forced auto-updating by any software on my system. In fact, there are times when it is legitimately essential to use a software version other than the latest one for various reasons - sometimes for a very extended period of time.

    If a piece of software demands forced updating and I must use that software, I find external ways to block its updating process, whatever that requires. In the case of Windows 10, I refuse to install it. I manually check for and allow updating at those times of my choosing, not the software maker. That allows me to vet the updates first, as well as allowing me to choose update times when my systems are either not in use or have down-times that permit a reasonable post-crash recovery time should an update go sour. Having used computers since the very first part of the mini-computer era (the 1980's), I've learned the hard way that this is the only way to go with respect to software updates, whatever they are and however they're delivered.

  • It worked for me with Opera 29 some months ago. Install the old version, kill the opera_autoupdate.exe from task manager, delete opera_autoupdate.exe from c\Program Files(x86)\Opera\26.x.x(or whatever version you downgraded to).

  • @lando242 "If you don't like it, don't use it." Instead, I use whatever I consider convenient for me to use, and I don't need it to be perfect otherwise I wouldn't be using anything at all, and I don't need to pretend it has no defects, and Opera doesn't need its users to refrain from discussing problems and only discuss its strong points. If you don't like posts about Opera problems, just ignore them, instead of crying about someone saying something not positive about Opera. Or even better, provide some constructive help to the original poster to solve the problem.

    @blackbird71 You have cut my quote conveniently. I said that Opera is the only software product I ever heard of that offers no control whatsoever on the update process, which was meant to indicate that this behavior is very unusual, not that it's unique. I confirm that so far I never heard of any other product with such behavior, and this appears to be the case for you too, since you could just vaguely mention "one or two free antivirus, unless I'm mistaken" (even if you come up with a list now, it'd be only because you had to look for such products), and since the Windows 10 doc I linked actually does not appear to apply only to Enterprise but to all editions and it explains f.ex. that

    ...updates will be automatically downloaded and installed whenever they’re available. (Unless you’re on a metered connection, in which case the updates won’t download until you opt to get them.).

    Of course you can call that "not real" control if you want, but that's definitely some level of control, very different from the zero level offered by Opera, and that level of control would be definitely enough for the Opera users who want more control on the updates in order to avoid updating while on an expensive connection or a connection with limited amount of traffic before expensive rates kick in. So it's simply not true that Windows 10 non-Enterprise offers the same level of control on updates as Opera.

    BTW this started to look like a pointless religion war so I'm out of it.

  • There is disusing a problem and then there is beating a dead horse. Clearly you are doing the latter.

  • [Mod edit: Please do not link to un-official Opera versions]

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