Why does the installation folder include the current version?

  • Hello,

    why does the installation folder include the current version? E.g. "C:\Users\XXX\AppData\Local\Programs\Opera\30.0.1835.88"?

    This causes a constant issue with my firewall, as the program folder changes after each update and hence my Opera is auto-blocked by my firewall. I then need to re-grant Opera internet access privileges, as my firewall only allows known applications to access my network.

    I don't know if other users experience this as similarly annoying, but I assume there may be the same issue other firewalls as well.

    Is there any particular reason for this folder naming?

    Best regards

  • Yes, because thats where the info for Opera is stored. If you check that folder right after an update you will fold folders for your current release and the previous release, each named after their version number.

    I would check and see if your firewall can tone down its aggressiveness somewhere in the setting or consider trying a different firewall. Or you could try a router with hardware firewall. They are a better option these days anyway.

  • What is the reasoning behind this folder structure?

    When a typical Windows program is updated, the new version just replaces the old version. The new version stays in the same place, so nothing gets broken- shortcuts, firewalls, etc.

  • What is the reasoning behind this folder structure?

    You would have to ask Chromium as it seems to be the default behavior for Chromium based browsers.

    One of the given reasons is that if there are any issues with the new version, you can easily go back to the old one.

    he new version stays in the same place, so nothing gets broken- shortcuts, firewalls, etc.

    Shortcuts should not be affected, if created rightly.

    About firewall, it has issues even if launcher.exe is used?

  • I would check and see if your firewall can tone down its aggressiveness somewhere in the setting or consider trying a different firewall.

    Indeed I could, but I want to have it that way. In my opinion a firewall which automatically decides which applications may access the internet and which not (so people who know nothing about computers don't need to worry about such things) isn't much of a firewall in terms of usefulness.

    One of the given reasons is that if there are any issues with the new version, you can easily go back to the old one.

    That will probably make sense. I mean usually I'd argue that there shouldn't be any need to downgrade so frequently that one would need a special feature for it. But I guess browser developers will sometimes need to release updates very quickly.
    But still other browser architectures manage without such a naming.

  • I'm annoyed by this behavior too - but likely it is not about to change. My firewall (old Comodo) at least notifies me about Opera upgrades this way (or rather it rememebers me to delete autoupdater task again).

  • Software based firewalls are not great security solutions. You really should invest in a router that has a built in firewall. All but the oldest and most terrible routers lack decent ones these days.

  • lando242, how would you teach your router to detect opera executable file change for example? That is why I'm using old Comodo - it watches both traffic itself and code components behavior (exe, dll). Even more - I can specify for example, that some executable has unlimited access, when run from explorer - but no access, if run from some other program. Quite handy to block accidental URL clicks from PDF viewer or similar.

    Router firewall is very good to block unwanted incoming traffic, but it can't so effectively filter outgoing traffic.

  • Hardware firewalls use things like port forwarding and port triggering. You make exceptions on a port by port basis. The setup depends on the make and model but its a standard feature these days. It also works for all the devices on your network with only a single point of configuration. So if you add other computers, use wifi for you tablets or phones or whatever you don't have to configure the software on each device. Its also built in. So you don't need to worry about paying a licensing fee or it going out of date or any of that bullocks.

  • lando242, don't you think that I know that and then we are talking about quite different things (network perimeter security versus application behavior control) anyway? Unfortunately this all doesn't help resolve steffinger92 (or my) problems with ever-changing opera folder.

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