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What is your Weather? :)

  • @joshl Nah, he just quit.

    Endless rain here today. Kinda nice for a change. ☂ 🌧

  • @s390g2 You are being?

    Rhinelander picture

    Equator West Africa? 🙂

  • @joshl Oh God...! Now it is very hot hear in Chennai, India. It is nearly 37°C here right now.

  • (Just disable the link^, guys.)

    Well, India was famous by it being an ancient source of wise guys and some culture, even the proto-language for the whole Europe.
    Now it's being ground down by Asia for its sins, you better get out.

  • Been promised an ease by recent forecasts, but now checked - the CNN Weather Service says we're having no such luck. Bloody Americans!👿

  • 32°C here again and warmer to the north. Some summers it never gets that warm, but this year it is frequent.
    Lots of smoke high in the sky from British Columbia, Canada fires reaching all the way to east coast US0_1534115352968_20180812_smokefromcacrop_20182242217_GOES16-ABI-CONUS-GEOCOLOR-2500x1500.jpg .

  • The new ice age or a global warming? We can't have both, can we?
    Carbon dioxide is now in every Earth documentary, like Surgeon General on cigarettes. Early this morning I watched episode 5 of Catastrophe, and the guy forgot to mention the AGW - while he did not forget to mention that we are about to enter a new freeze!
    Is the AGW still a conspiracy by bureaucrats and bad scientists or is it a reality?
    Can't they have a comprehensive proof to us wise guys at last? Or is science destined to become a new stupid religion - you believe, you do not?

  • @joshl said in What is your Weather? 🙂:

    ...
    Is the AGW still a conspiracy by bureaucrats and bad scientists or is it a reality?
    Can't they have a comprehensive proof to us wise guys at last? Or is science destined to become a new stupid religion - you believe, you do not?

    It remains a theory - an attempt by certain people to describe reality. Because it is essentially based on computer models, a great deal of assumptions and interpretation get folded in by both the nature of the models themselves (what mathematical emphases are placed on which atmospheric/chemical processes and how they are theorized to interact over time) and in the quality of the data being fed into the models (which is constantly being tweaked - to compensate for certain things according to theory supporters and to intentionally create biased results according to critics).

    A major problem relates to the backward look scientists take into historical climate records (either man-created or conclusions drawn from various geologic/geophysical traces) and what interpretation they make of what they see - and there's major disagreement over many of the claims made about what the "climate records" indicate. As a result, it is difficult (if not impossible) to accurately run the models against what occurred in the past to "proof" the models themselves in order to make accurate future projections.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that our human understanding of the full role the sun plays on earth climate is limited since many solar processes are poorly understood (remaining unproven theories)... it is known that there is cyclicity in solar output (eg: sunspot cycles, for one), but the mechanisms and the full earth climatic consequences are not well understood yet. Part of the problem is that detailed research into all these things has only really gone on for the last 60-70 years and what we normally consider typical "precision" and "scope" of 'science' in such fields has only existed over the last 50 years - very short time spans in terms of something so long-term as 'climate'.

  • Watching documentaries lately, they can see levels of oxygen and whether a meteorite had stricken or not.:)

    About the sun, I believe it's learnable. As a star, astrophysicists can see and compare with lots of observed objects in different stages...
    Back to climate, last thing I heard was that the recent glaciation periods are related to variations in Earth's orbit around the Sun. There were other theories, however...

    Moreover, there are or may be other, extra-Solar-System factors. Like the System passing through an interstellar cloud of gas or something. Yes, there are some, and it may affect both the Sun and the space between.

  • @blackbird71 said in What is your Weather? 🙂:

    Another thing to keep in mind is that our human understanding of the full role the sun plays on earth climate is limited since many solar processes are poorly understood (remaining unproven theories)... it is known that there is cyclicity in solar output (eg: sunspot cycles, for one), but the mechanisms and the full earth climatic consequences are not well understood yet. Part of the problem is that detailed research into all these things has only really gone on for the last 60-70 years and what we normally consider typical "precision" and "scope" of 'science' in such fields has only existed over the last 50 years - very short time spans in terms of something so long-term as 'climate'.

    Yonder days I was taught about spots being regular, then I hear about some 11-year cycle.
    Now I learn about new phenomena by year. New methods of researching the Star...
    Like trivia that a photon (light) produced in the core, bounces within the sun for millions of years and if it's lucky, then travels throughout the cosmos, some tiny fraction of them reaching Earth in 8-some minutes.
    So hence the sun is totally dim and can't be "xrayed", 'doctors' use "ultrasound" to see the sun's "internal organs" and structure.
    Since the sun's interior is mostly plasma by mass, and the sun's nature is to blow up every second by billions with lots of moving heat and "coyotic" convection, the sun's magnetosphere is "a mess", thus producing lots of "scenery" like spots and flares.
    Some stars regularly but rarely produce superflares any single one of which would sterilise such a planet as our Earth. And it's uncertain if our sun will do that or not.

  • In the meantime, it's autumn moving up here, north of Moscow. Trees green and temps not fallen too much yet, rains started to lash and sun hiding behind blanketing cloud.
    We are to expect a short "Indian summer" which, due to shortness of Indians, is traditionally called some "old ladies' summer" here:)

  • Year turned towards winter at last yesterday, and I overslept phenomenally.
    It's normal Autumn now - 3 to 5 centigrade, but I'm not cold, especially with our central heating having successfully started. Some creepy drip out the window every night, can't even definitely tell it's raining, but the homicide squad in the morning sees the evidence, wet.

  • Slow raining during the day now. We definitely need a word for that. Like "yuck-wet-drizzle" or something. You can't see the rain but only the results.

  • Drizzle generally works. We had that all day yesterday - today is sunny. For us, time change tonight/tomorrow (Technically at 2 AM tomorrow.)

  • Snow here today, but on the brink of turning to rain. Still hoping for another bike ride before winter really sets in.

  • @sgunhouse said in What is your Weather? 🙂:

    time change

    Like H.G.Wells?

    Russians ride bikes in blizzards, really stoic.

  • @joshl No, rather the end to what Europeans generally refer to as "Summer Time", though we call "Daylight Savings Time" Kind of ironic that we are on "standard time" for ... just over 4 months of the year, we spend more of the year on "summer time" than "standard time".

  • Blizzard in Nebraska, 20+tornados in Illinois. Here, just an early start to Winter.

    0_1543781445146_IMG_4578.jpg

  • @s390g2 Hello, doggy!
    The dog speaks English?
    Wet winter here, frost teased us a bit and hid.

  • @joshl 🐶 😤 No snow yet? This year it all started about a month early and then stayed with no relief.
    The dog is sure happy about that, so he says.