Do more on the web, with a fast and secure browser!

Download Opera browser with:

  • built-in ad blocker
  • battery saver
  • free VPN
Download Opera

why did opera browser change like this?

  • Originally posted by ersi:

    Originally posted by leushino:

    There was a point there that I tried to convey twice in a row, but you still interpreted it exactly the opposite way. Maybe you are too much tongue-in-cheek, sarcastic, angry, etc. while I'm now carefully presenting the point for you again, for the third time in another way. I have given up hope now that you will get the point, but I'm doing it anyway, out of sheer kindness.

    (snipped)

    What the company is doing now is throwing all this away. Instead of keeping the status as the smallest among the big, they are now producing something that identifies as Chrome/Chromium in the browser statistics. No developer has any reason to test websites against something that is just another Chrome. How can the user base grow now? Obviously it can only shrink.

    You protest to this conclusion by giving two contradictory answers:
    1. Too early to make predictions.
    2. Opera will become a great success. There are only a handful of whiners.

    What should I make of this? As you have said a few times, there are far too many blessings in your life, so coherence is utterly irrelevant to you.

    Well, what "I" make of this is that you frequently resort to personal attacks when others happen to disagree with you. And your attacks become rather nasty. Furthermore your prognostications evidently mean very little to Opera as a company and to several others on this forum who happen to hold a difference of opinion. You see... here's the thing. When someone happens to disagree with your cleverly constructed arguments, that does not necessarily translate into that person being an imbecile and incapable of following them. In truth, holding to such a position (as you do) simply indicates that you are somewhat arrogant (i.e. if he/she cannot agree with me [and I am always right], ergo, he/she must be mentally deficient). In a word: no.

    In addition (there's always an addition, eh?), it doesn't really matter what "you" think or "how" you present your arguments. You have no authority where Opera is concerned. You have no persuasive influence on the company's decisions. And in case you haven't noticed, the company is proceeding with the development of the new browser "in spite of your arguments." Evidently they also do not hold your opinions.

    An aside: having blessings in one's life has no relevant connection with being capable or incapable of following a coherently constructed argument. In my case I simply happen to disagree with you.

    And now it seems to me that there is little point in continuing this discussion. You always resort to personal attacks and I don't appreciate that. So I wish you well. Good-bye.

  • Wrong! I do not owe them anything becouse it is my support (and others like me, of course) who make Opera what it is and makes them money. Certainly do not expect to be payed 🙂 but I DO NOT owe them anything and I'm free to go on and look for really advances browser as Opera used to be.

    "I think this is the end of a beautiful friendship!"

    Nothing more - nothing less.

    ;Edited only to change "enything" to "anything"

  • Originally posted by svetivoda:

    Wrong! I do not owe them anything becouse it is my support (and others like me, of course) who make Opera what it is and makes them money. Certainly do not expect to be payed 🙂 but I DO NOT owe them enything and I'm free to go on and look for really advances browser as Opera used to be.

    "I think this is the end of a beautiful friendship!"

    Nothing more - nothing less.

    This is my point with changing the browser engine your gona piss a lot of people off changing the browser engine every so often I really hope this the end of that. Also before changing the browser should take a community vote I have never seen a poll on the engine change, then again, Opea can do what they want right? Also I think they were unique with their own engine. They need their own engine that's faster than the chrome engine cause really chrome just don't cut it; I hope Oprea does not add any worse crap from chrome like their extensions. they have exploits that may cripple Opera also chrome spys on the user. I never new Opera to spy but Google does and that's a fact I hope Oprea is not on board with this that would be sad if they were?

  • Originally posted by leushino:

    When someone happens to disagree with your cleverly constructed arguments, that does not necessarily translate into that person being an imbecile and incapable of following them.

    The topic of this thread is "why did opera browser change like this?" All you are saying here is "disagree" without any argumentation at all. And you repeat repeat repeat the same in long diatribes devoid of any argumentation, thus simply disrupting the discussion. If you think argumentation is invalid, then what is valid for you? Knowing you from before, I know your answer: authority. But what gives you authority? Who gave it to you? And why do you think authority needs defence by you? You admittedly defend authority very devotedly, but without any reasoning it looks quite silly. And what kind of authority is it anyway when it needs your defence? Rhetorical questions 🙂

    Originally posted by leushino:

    In addition (there's always an addition, eh?), it doesn't really matter what "you" think or "how" you present your arguments. You have no authority where Opera is concerned.

    Apply the same to yourself. When you do, I'll call you fair and balanced.

  • If they did it to increase market share, they're clearly failing:

    See browser statistics by version: Opera 12.1x is holding its ground with only about 1/5th of users having switched to the Chromium-based versions.

    The same is corroborated by Sitepoint's Craig Buckler's analysis of StatCounter numbers:

    The Blink editions of Opera (version 15+) account for 0.2% of the market — or 18% of the browser’s user-base. Opera users normally upgrade quickly so it seems not everyone is convinced by the new version.

  • Originally posted by Raven:

    If they did it to increase market share, they're clearly failing:

    See browser statistics by version: Opera 12.1x is holding its ground with only about 1/5th of users having switched to the Chromium-based versions.

    The same is corroborated by Sitepoint's Craig Buckler's analysis of StatCounter numbers:

    The Blink editions of Opera (version 15+) account for 0.2% of the market — or 18% of the browser’s user-base. Opera users normally upgrade quickly so it seems not everyone is convinced by the new version.

    If we are to take the company's current tagline "we are concentrating on our strengths" literally, then this must indicate that after a feeble attempt at a Chrome clone they will dump desktop browser for good, because this is evidently not their strength. They may keep it only as a mirror and testbox for the mobile browser.

  • Originally posted by ersi:

    If we are to take the company's current tagline "we are concentrating on our strengths" literally, then this must indicate that after a feeble attempt at a Chrome clone they will dump desktop browser for good, because this is evidently not their strength. They may keep it only as a mirror and testbox for the mobile browser.

    But I literally can't use the mobile browser. :right:

  • Originally posted by Frenzie:

    Originally posted by ersi:

    If we are to take the company's current tagline "we are concentrating on our strengths" literally, then this must indicate that after a feeble attempt at a Chrome clone they will dump desktop browser for good, because this is evidently not their strength. They may keep it only as a mirror and testbox for the mobile browser.

    But I literally can't use the mobile browser. :right:

    Looks like Opera 12 literally can't follow those disqus links. However, I think I found your comment.

    Space is a grave issue, yes, on top of the hardware requirements.

    How about the Classic Mobile version?

  • Originally posted by ersi:

    Looks like Opera 12 literally can't follow those disqus links.

    Jumps to and highlights those links just fine here -O12.16

    //edit

    Originally posted by ersi:

    If we are to take the company's current tagline "we are concentrating on our strengths" literally, then this must indicate that after a feeble attempt at a Chrome clone they will dump desktop browser for good

    Looking at what they are doing now, selling fastmail, closing my opera i would say that that's pretty plausible.
    For now the desktop browser is one of the main sources of income. But if it will continue the way it is now...
    Or as von Tetzchner said they'll focus on the advertising business.

  • Originally posted by artmil:

    Originally posted by ersi:

    Looks like Opera 12 literally can't follow those disqus links.

    Jumps to and highlights those links just fine here -O12.16

    Possibly my urlfilter.ini is too strict then. The new comments section is misformatted otherwise too. But I will leave it so.

  • Originally posted by ersi:

    Looks like Opera 12 literally can't follow those disqus links. However, I think I found your comment.

    Works for me, after whitelisting a bunch of Disqus scripts.

    Originally posted by ersi:

    How about the Classic Mobile version?

    That one works as flawlessly as ever, of course.

  • Originally posted by ersi:

    Originally posted by Raven:

    If they did it to increase market share, they're clearly failing:

    See browser statistics by version: Opera 12.1x is holding its ground with only about 1/5th of users having switched to the Chromium-based versions.

    The same is corroborated by Sitepoint's Craig Buckler's analysis of StatCounter numbers:

    The Blink editions of Opera (version 15+) account for 0.2% of the market — or 18% of the browser’s user-base. Opera users normally upgrade quickly so it seems not everyone is convinced by the new version.

    If we are to take the company's current tagline "we are concentrating on our strengths" literally, then this must indicate that after a feeble attempt at a Chrome clone they will dump desktop browser for good, because this is evidently not their strength. They may keep it only as a mirror and testbox for the mobile browser.

    I was waiting for someone to link some numbers! I was curious if this Blink gambit and releasing very early/first was paying off. I am kind of disappointed that it didn't (0.2% ?!) but not terribly surprised. Opera 17 is the best Chrome browser so far, and I like it for that, but it still pales in comparison to 12.16. So now I often have both versions of Opera running these days.

    I really hope that the dev team continues to work hard on Opera Blink to get some of the cool features that Presto had. But after seeing these numbers I am even more wary than before.

  • Originally posted by Raven:

    If they did it to increase market share, they're clearly failing:

    See browser statistics by version: Opera 12.1x is holding its ground with only about 1/5th of users having switched to the Chromium-based versions.

    The same is corroborated by Sitepoint's Craig Buckler's analysis of StatCounter numbers:

    The Blink editions of Opera (version 15+) account for 0.2% of the market — or 18% of the browser’s user-base. Opera users normally upgrade quickly so it seems not everyone is convinced by the new version.

    Sorry, but how can you be so dumb?
    How do you want to compare the adoption of a browser version delivered via auto-update and one which there's no notice it's available?

    Check this for real numbers:
    http://www.zdnet.com/time-to-move-on-final-patch-for-opera-12-due-by-mid-2014-7000023427/

    About half of the Opera desktop users are on 15+ by now.
    (Note: there's no way to know how many are upgrading from a prior version and how many are new users.)

  • Originally posted by rafaelluik:

    How do you want to compare the adoption of a browser version delivered via auto-update and one which there's no notice it's available?

    Also, there are (or there were at least) many sites that identifies Opera 15+ as Chrome so the numbers may not be so correct.

  • Originally posted by rafaelluik:

    Check this for real numbers:http://www.zdnet.com/time-to-move-on-final-patch-for-opera-12-due-by-mid-2014-7000023427/

    Hahahaha! Oh my, Rafael! You couldn't have picked a worse link than this particular ZDNet article to support your premise!
    Liam Tung actually wrote in that post that Opera 12.16 HAD NOT BEEN RELEASED! (The post was made on November 20, 2013)
    Yes...that was me that pointed that inaccuracy out...wizard57m-cnet...the post you flagged as spam! Yeah, I know, you're
    wondering how in the world do I know that? Hehehe...figure it out on your own.

    Now, to gain a bit of perspective, perhaps a quote from that particular blog post is in order, caution...it demonstrates that Opera's
    user base is indeed shrinking, especially on the "desktop"...
    quote
    "Over the past year, Opera's desktop users have fallen from 55 million to 51 million, meaning it still has around 25 million users that it risks losing if they don't like the change.

    But perhaps more importantly for the company, the value of those users in revenue terms has fallen even faster. Opera's desktop revenues in the third quarter of this year, driven by search dollars from Google under a two-year search deal set to expire in August 2014, were just $13.8m.

    That was down 25 percent on the $18m in desktop revenues it earned a year ago — when it was Opera's largest source of income. Now desktop is a distant third to mobile advertising and carrier dollars, which brought in $30m and $17m respectively that quarter."
    End quote.

    Now, Rafael, please explain what "auto-update" and "no notice available" have to do with any of the statistics mentioned in the ZDNet article?

    Wizard57M

  • Originally posted by Raven:

    If they did it to increase market share, they're clearly failing:

    See browser statistics by version: Opera 12.1x is holding its ground with only about 1/5th of users having switched to the Chromium-based versions.

    The same is corroborated by Sitepoint's Craig Buckler's analysis of StatCounter numbers:

    The Blink editions of Opera (version 15+) account for 0.2% of the market — or 18% of the browser’s user-base. Opera users normally upgrade quickly so it seems not everyone is convinced by the new version.

    The number you posted above may be correct. There are several reliable sources show the same number that means it's believable:

    http://clicky.com/marketshare/global/web-browsers/opera/

    Marketshare is calculated from nearly 500 million daily page views across the 500,000+ web sites that use Clicky Web Analytics

    After Opera 18 released, the percentage number of O17 drop from about 0.2% to 0, and O18 rose about the same amount.

    29/Nov/2013:
    O18: 0.2%
    O12.1: 0.42%
    O11.1: 0.16%
    Opera: 1.4%

    30/Nov/2013:
    O18: 0.26%
    O12.1: 0.54%
    O11.1: 0.24%
    Opera: 1.81%

    ...about 14% users base.

    ======================

    to Wizard57M:

    I find the funny thing on this ZDNet advertisement is that, the statistic 50% people move to Chr---what ever is base on this:

    Kolondra thinks the numbers so far suggest they might stick around. "We're getting close to we will have 50 percent of people already on the new browser. We're really excited about that. Even without forcing uptake, we see uptake is quite encouraging."

  • Originally posted by rafaelluik:

    Check this for real numbers:
    http://www.zdnet.com/time-to-move-on-final-patch-for-opera-12-due-by-mid-2014-7000023427/

    About half of the Opera desktop users are on 15+ by now.

    That's great. And according to reliable sources 90% of users have stopped using bookmarks.

  • Originally posted by Wizard57M:

    Now, to gain a bit of perspective, perhaps a quote from that particular blog post is in order, caution...it demonstrates that Opera's
    user base is indeed shrinking, especially on the "desktop"...
    quote
    "Over the past year, Opera's desktop users have fallen from 55 million to 51 million, meaning it still has around 25 million users that it risks losing if they don't like the change.

    Why do you readily ignore Opera went from 60 million users (1Q 2012) to 52 million (2Q 2013) when only Opera 11.x and 12.x were released?
    And again you ignore there's no notification about the new versions, which means users may still be leaving Opera altogether (because of 11.x/12.x) without even knowing Opera 15+ is available.

    Originally posted by Wizard57M:

    inaccuracy

    It doesn't matter what's said about 12.16 release date. Kolondra is directly quoted. I don't believe the article author injected something there inside the quote.

    Originally posted by Krake:

    according to reliable sources 90% of users have stopped using bookmarks.

    ??? You fail miserably at making a joke. I'd say 90% of Opera users indeed don't need bookmarks.

    Originally posted by cyxovi:

    The number you posted above may be correct. There are several reliable sources show the same number that means it's believable:

    http://clicky.com/marketshare/global/web-browsers/opera/

    And how do you know this one is indeed reliable so you can count them among these "several reliable sources"? There's no way to know their method is infallible.
    You need to read the posts from Haavard's blog regarding market share so you'll understand how these sources (no matter how big and well known) were never reliable compared to the official declarations of number of users the companies make.
    http://my.opera.com/haavard/blog/2008/12/12/net-applications-again-opera-vs-chrome-actual-numbers-vs-claimed-market-sha
    http://my.opera.com/haavard/blog/2009/11/03/browser-stats
    http://my.opera.com/haavard/blog/2010/01/02/odd-browser-stats

    As a matter of curiosity I checked StatCounter last 7 days bar spreadsheet data, it gives Opera 10~12.1x about 0.64% and Opera 15+ about 0.45% of the total market.

  • Originally posted by cyxovi:

    The number you posted above may be correct. There are several reliable sources show the same number that means it's believable:

    Sorry everybody, my bad.

    The number you (Raven) posted above may be correct. There are several independent sources show the same number that means it's reliable.

  • Originally posted by rafaelluik:

    Originally posted by Krake:

    according to reliable sources 90% of users have stopped using bookmarks.

    ??? You fail miserably at making a joke. I'd say 90% of Opera users indeed don't need bookmarks.

    I'd go a step farther and say that 100% of browser users don't need bookmarks.
    Everybody can store addresses with a text editor.