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Here are some suggestions for those looking for alternatives to Opera 12 (and use Opera Mail)

  • Well... I'm glad you learned something. Very good. Hopefully all those poor lost souls will find the alternative browsers they require and migrate to them. And so the story goes.... on and on.

  • anybody yet found a way to make FF(derivatives) doing 'Spatial Navigation'?

  • Originally posted by alf5000:

    anybody yet found a way to make FF(derivatives) doing 'Spatial Navigation'?

    There was http://www.mozilla.org/access/keyboard/snav/

    But even though that page was last updated in 2012, in 2011 they apparently decided to remove support: https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=670880#c2

    Anyhoo, there's other alternatives:
    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/mouseless-browsing/
    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/vimperator/

  • @Frenzie - whow, that was a really quick answer!
    I read it as 'No, there isn't a way to teach FF Spatial Navigation'.

    My replacement for Opera Presto (THREE different applications and a ton of extra addons --- O<12 was really an impressive program)
    - FF
    - Thunderbird (with the nice side effect of the Lightening Addon)
    - Autohotkey
    - lots and lots of addons (laurenbacall did a nice summary above)

    just want to add some addons to laurenbacalls's list - well, not actually to make FF more resemble Opera but I came across these addons when trying to make FF behave like Opera -- I quite like them
    Imagus: The extension is intended to complement/extend the browser's image handling capabilities
    Autopager: a Firefox extension which automatically loads the next page of a site inline when you reach the end of the current page
    Element Hiding Helper for Adblock Plus: Element Hiding Helper is a companion extension for Adblock Plus meant to make creating element hiding rules easier.
    Fox Input: Keyboard-friendly addon that lets you access search fields, input fields etc
    Hide Caption Titlebar Plus: Maximize your screen space by controlling the presence of Firefox window Title-bar (Caption) & borders!
    HyperTranslate: Advanced inline translator: Select the text then press selected key to translate selection.
    XMarks: FREE Bookmark Sync

  • In reading these last few posts, I realize that I've been wrong about the usefulness of this thread. I was wrong. It definitely has a positive role to play in helping out other Opera users.

  • Originally posted by rilef:

    Add keywords to Firefox or SeaMonkey bookmarks by right-clicking any bookmark, then select Properties. No extension is necessary. Firefox and SeaMonkey keywords work like Opera 12 bookmark nicknames.

    Ah, I can see it now (on OSX there's no Properties context menu item for bookmarks), there's an 'expand' arrow in the bookmark manager pane that displays the extra input box. Good to know 🆙, saves an extra addon for some.

    I suppose the benefit of the addon is adding the Keyword input box to the pop-up bookmark star in the addressbar when you first create one, as well as Description, and a few other options, similar to expanding Opera's 'Details' button.

  • SeaMonkey - same rendering engine as FF... only the GUI is a bit different.
    Very nice. Have been using it on Linux for a while.

    http://www.imagebam.com/image/450a16288840872

  • Originally posted by rilef:

    The only "Pro" I see for SeaMonkey is an integrated mail client (which apparently you do not use).

    Maybe I'm missing something, but SeaMonkey doesn't seem especially more integrated than any old browser and mail client, other than that they've got a few little buttons in the bottom left. Sure, the shared memory aspect could be of interest on low-memory systems, but something like Claws or Sylpheed is light too (or even something text-based like Mutt). I think it's the GUI integration that makes Opera's approach interesting.

  • Originally posted by ocky:

    SeaMonkey - same rendering engine as FF... only the GUI is a bit different.
    Very nice. Have been using it on Linux for a while.

    The UI is awful when it's compared with Opera. I am disappointed about how a Mozilla-based browsers had no any appreciable progress in this area after a years of their evolution.

    I hope someday someone will try to recreate Presto Opera's user interface(which is still unmatched) on XUL-layer.

  • Originally posted by ocky:

    SeaMonkey - same rendering engine as FF... only the GUI is a bit different.
    Very nice. Have been using it on Linux for a while.

    http://www.imagebam.com/image/450a16288840872

    Look at the real estate you've lost at the top of your screen. To my tired eyes, this looks like my 1997 Netscape browser... only 16 years out of date now.

  • Originally posted by rilef:

    Thus, there appears little reason to switch from Opera mail to SeaMonkey or Thunderbird mail (i.e. from one deprecated mail client to another deprecated mail client). Or vice versa. That is, if you use a mail client, and you like this mail client, you should keep this mail client.

    To my way of thinking there is really only one viable email client (if you must have one) and that is the Bat. T-bird development has pretty much dried up since Mozilla dropped it. Other than a community offering security patches and bug fixes, it is what it is (and it's nothing to write home about).

  • Originally posted by leushino:

    Originally posted by rilef:

    Thus, there appears little reason to switch from Opera mail to SeaMonkey or Thunderbird mail (i.e. from one deprecated mail client to another deprecated mail client). Or vice versa. That is, if you use a mail client, and you like this mail client, you should keep this mail client.

    To my way of thinking there is really only one viable email client (if you must have one) and that is the Bat. T-bird development has pretty much dried up since Mozilla dropped it. Other than a community offering security patches and bug fixes, it is what it is (and it's nothing to write home about).

    Is there really any significant reason for any continued development of any eMail browser, in general, these days? From my observations, most of them have rather fully plugged any browser exploitation holes over the last number of years, and their feature-sets have all long since peaked out. Which means, other than possibly finding one that's integrated into a web-browser (for those to whom that matters), there shouldn't be much user concern about whether or not there's active development of a particular eMail browser. And given that so many users simply rely on web-based eMail access, there's not much economic sense for purveyors of eMail programs to invest much into adding bells and whistles... so the eMail browsers out there now are likely not to change much in years to come.

    Myself, I'm a firm believer in downloading and keeping permanent copies of all my eMails on-site... so I've primarily used a stand-alone eMail program (currently PocoMail, now out-of-production... before that, Outlook Express... and before that, Outlook) for years, using webmail only for a quick check of messages if I'm on the go somewhere. The main features of an eMail program, to me, reside in the user comfort-option category (foldering, sorting, searching, archiving/backup, security against exploitation, etc, etc). And those features for most eMail browsers currently available have remained largely static for quite a long time. Hence, the folks running Opera, Outlook Express, PocoMail, Thunderbird, or a myriad of other eMail browsers will probably be able to use them for years to come, as long as the OS will still support them (or vice versa). Bottom line: use whatever you like for your needs, whether or not it's still actively being developed... it isn't going to suddenly go away after you start using it.

  • Blackbird, that makes perfect sense. So why the angst among those who mourn the passing of Opera's suite? Just use Opera 12 for its email function alone OR use the standalone email client.

    As for me... I got rid of my separate email clients (Outlook and Thunderbird) more than a year ago and haven't looked back. I've no need for email clients these days. The few "important" emails I do receive (via webmail accounts), I download and save on an external hard drive... and they are few and far between. Most of my communication these days is via texting and social networks. Email for me (as well as my family and friends) is pretty much passe.

  • Lets back to more constructive topic and give a spirit to Opera Dev.
    This one of many thread discussion will let user speak their specific old behavior from 12 instead of giving bad score in to 17.
    http://my.opera.com/community/forums/topic.dml?id=1784592

    Still whole browser above cannot beat Opera 12 which handle "live mouse hover events" when inspect some element.
    Read this http://my.opera.com/community/forums/findpost.pl?id=14960362
    and hopefully can solve on next Opera 18 which is state here http://my.opera.com/community/forums/findpost.pl?id=14960572

    For me as a webmaster, DragonFly from Opera 12 nicely work to inspect element and manipulate it Live!!
    This is what the reason I am stick in Opera, event on some cases Opera 12 DragonFly crash during inspect.

    Regarding, Tweaking or any shortcut function. I prefer the old Opera which is default activated. All browser had their own tweaking function. Most are same. I can't see big different here comparing other browser mention above.

    I remember 6-8 years ago, afaik Opera being MOST innovative idea browser such first introducing TAB, Wand/Sync Link, Site Specific Setting, built-in Note, side menu, Private Tab, torrents (was) etc.. And built-in Download manager Opera is a mpost reliable I've ever seen for any network connection.

    Well,
    please continue constructive discussion.
    And I see the SLEIPNIR browser using and try to using old Opera behaviour which is dismissed from current Opera 17. 🙂
    Lets try SLEIPNIR...

  • Originally posted by leushino:

    Originally posted by ocky:

    SeaMonkey - same rendering engine as FF... only the GUI is a bit different.
    Very nice. Have been using it on Linux for a while.

    http://www.imagebam.com/image/450a16288840872[/quote]

    Look at the real estate you've lost at the top of your screen. To my tired eyes, this looks like my 1997 Netscape browser... only 16 years out of date now.

    Nah, no real estate lost. Bars can be collapsed if so desired. http://www.imagebam.com/image/a5c685289411489

    (Of course also comes with an html composer).

  • Originally posted by Frenzie:

    I think it's the GUI integration that makes Opera's approach interesting.

    Consistent tabbed interface, my favourite ever since Pegasus Mail. Eudora is even more perfect interface-wise. And old Opera. This interface makes best sense, but the dark side is forcing it into the oblivion 😞

  • Originally posted by funksoulbro:

    Originally posted by Salahuddin1:

    You know leushino, if you're tired of reading negative things about the new Opera browser, maybe you should stop reading these forums. Not quite sure what possesses you to respond to everyone who makes an anti Opera sentiment on these forums. Not even sure how one man can commit so much time and energy to such a cause.

    Well said. The guy is like some over-defensive fanboy getting angry when people criticise his beloved company. I'm looking around for an alternative to Opera as, like many long-time Opera users, I think the new version is terrible, so I found the OP's post useful.

    Ah! That makes more sens now 🙂

  • Originally posted by Salahuddin1:

    Originally posted by leushino:

    Did you say "quicker than Opera in loading pages"??? Not according to Peacekeeper. I challenge you to go over to http://peacekeeper.futuremark.com and test it for yourself. SM is one of the slowest browsers according to their bench tests. It's clunky all right and that is why it has such a small acceptance among users. It is definitely not a viable alternative to Opera unless you want a browser that looks like the old Netscape browser from 1998.

    Peacekeeper is an overall benchmark of many different tests and only one of many benchmarking tools. It certainly is not a measure of which browser loads web pages faster.

    Empty trucks(new opera) run faster than loaded trucks, so shall we start running empty trucks. Or do you use your browser for F1 racing? Why so much fuss about fastness ( by milliseconds).
    When features are added back to new opera maybe it will become slow like chrome(and a huge memory usage pig).

    Thanks for mentioning the FF addons. Few more FF addons -
    Fast Dial - closest alternative of opera speed dial
    Secure login - wand replacement
    Extended statusbar
    Video Downloadhelper
    Quick translator
    Download stausbar
    Flagfox
    Image Zoom
    Handy dictionary

  • Originally posted by j4jasbir:

    Empty trucks(new opera) run faster than loaded trucks, so shall we start running empty trucks.

    I don't think that relation between the features *in the UI* and in the *engine* used to render the pages that people come up with is correct...

    Actually there's a fact to back my suspicion. If you aren't a very new Opera user you should know that Opera 10.50 and a subsequent version that I don't remember very well of beat Chrome in the speed tests at the time it was launched.

    I'll keep my previous suggestion (just update it to 18). :whistle:

  • Originally posted by rafaelluik:

    Originally posted by j4jasbir:

    Empty trucks(new opera) run faster than loaded trucks, so shall we start running empty trucks.

    I don't think that relation between the features *in the UI* and in the *engine* used to render the pages that people come up with is correct...

    Try firefox/opera with and without plugins,addons . You will see the difference.

    Originally posted by rafaelluik:

    If you aren't a very new Opera user you should know that Opera 10.50 and a subsequent version that I don't remember very well of beat Chrome in the speed tests at the time it was launched.

    Kindly read again my post as I don't care about speed tests.If I had cared about speed test or reviews, then I would have never used opera as my main browser.