URL History arrow missing

  • Can someone please educate me on how to add the arrow that allowed me to view my browsing history in the URL field?

  • Opera version ?, found via 'O Menu / Help / About Opera' or 'O Menu / About Opera'.

  • Sorry, version 23

  • v 23.0.1522.75 to be precise

  • You can find the history in Opera -> Recently closed
    Unforunately that's the only built-in way.
    However, there are extensions to add this ;)

  • There is also Menu > History.

  • Not looking for just the history..I specifically wanted the down arrow in the url field that let you quickly access previously visited sites.

    Why that was removed at all I cant figure out.

    Thank you for the extension information. I will check it out.

  • ...
    Why that was removed at all I cant figure out.
    ...

    Perhaps it simply costs less. Development of a browser involves conceptualization, design/integration, test, debug, retest, QA, issuance, and post-issuance support. Each user "feature" incorporated natively adds to the cost all along the way, particularly in the realm of integration where an added user feature has to function on a non-interfering and smooth basis with everything else in the browser - in all manner of modes and against all sorts of site details (coding, fonts, protocols, scripting, etc). Letting (in most cases) third-party developers provide various user "features" exports virtually all the associated development and subsequent support costs into somebody else's pocket. This becomes especially noteworthy as versions are redesigned - it becomes "somebody else's" problem to keep a particular user-feature fully operative after a coding change in the basic browser.

    So it's not about "removing" features... it's about saving money by not adding them into the basic design in the first place, and trusting somebody else to take the initiative in covering the costs of providing and supporting them.

  • I realize the process as I work in software development.
    Since the feature was already included in previous versions of Opera, it would be a simple matter of moving the existing code from one version to the other.

  • When Opera moved from Presto (their own engine) to Blink (Chromium's engine), the browser was rewritten from scratch. More info here, specially:

    "When we took the decision to switch to Chromium, compatibility was one reason — but most importantly, we wanted to spend our time on browser innovation, rather than competing on building a rendering engine. We had a deep look at Opera’s internal architecture and it soon became clear that Quick, the cross-platform UI framework we’d introduced back in 2003, was so entangled with Presto’s code that just swapping Presto with Chromium was far from a straightforward task."

  • I realize the process as I work in software development.
    Since the feature was already included in previous versions of Opera, it would be a simple matter of moving the existing code from one version to the other.

    If you work in software development, you should realize that there's no such thing as a "simple matter of moving the existing code from one version to the other" when the basic engine framework and the API's on which your interface program is being overlaid are all different conceptually from what you've previously dealt with. The GUI's access points, rules, and interactions will be different across the two engines (Presto and Blink), so that code which ran under the Presto regime will not necessarily "simply move" to the Blink regime, let alone produce the same user interactions.

    Consider the implications inherent in a user-interface "arrow-button" accessing a history file or memory block which is architected differently than previously, and which operates through a sandbox principle of separate processes for each tab. It's not necessarily "simple"... the only simplicity is in the initial concept of an arrow button providing such access, which is not the same thing as actually doing it.

    Multiply the transference of this one "feature" or characteristic (an address box arrow accessing history) by the literal thousands of other "features", subtle or not, that exist and interact a certain way in a mature browser, and the result would be a major, hopelessly-complex "copying" effort. At a minimum, heavy triage of the transferred features would be necessitated by the sheer magnitude of the task. Instead, Opera elected to start from the ground up (build a completely new GUI) by first assessing what features it believed it needed to expend its efforts upon, whether we as users agree with its initial feature choices or not.

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