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  • Hi,
    I'm on Win 10, Opera 53.
    I'm located in Texas, VPN set to the Americas.
    When I click on the current headline in Huffungtonpost (Texas school shooting), I get the message above.
    Why is that?

  • @esebm The video player uses HTML5 or Flash? Plug-ins like Flash bypass the VPN.

  • The next time this happens I'll try to find out.
    However, if the VPN is set to the Americas and I try to watch a video on an American website there shouldn't be any problems at all, bypassing or not.

  • @esebm If you are in America, maybe.

    However you should realize that the VPN says 'Americas', so it may not give you a USA IP address.

  • As I said in my original post, I'm located in Texas.
    No USA IP address, OK.
    How come I see ads in the Russian and Norwegian language on all kinds of US websites? I have never seen an ad in one of the "American" languages, Spanish for example.
    Or, when I access Amazon, it tells me that a certain item cannot be shipped to Sweden?
    Or the quoted prices are in a Scandinavian currency and cannot be changed to US dollars?
    I'm sure you have an explanation for all that.

  • @esebm said in This video is restricted from playing in your location:

    How come I see ads in the Russian and Norwegian language on all kinds of US websites?

    Because the sites are guessing that the IP address you are using is from those places.

    @esebm said in This video is restricted from playing in your location:

    Or, when I access Amazon, it tells me that a certain item cannot be shipped to Sweden?

    With VPN turned on? If so, then it may have the same cause as above.

  • The sites are guessing?
    When my VPN is set to the Americas (and I have checked numerous times that it is an IP address in the US) how can any US website "guess" that my IP address is from Russian or Scandinavian countries? Either the VPN works correctly or it doesn't. I guess the latter is the case.
    It may hide my IP address, which is the main purpose of a VPN, I guess, but it does not correctly tell a website that I am located in the US. That seems to be a big flaw!

  • Try

    Then enable the VPN and refresh that page...

    You may need to use a VPN extension to access some sites.
    Look at Chrome Store as well.

  • @esebm See https://blogs.opera.com/desktop/2018/01/opera-50-introduces-anti-bitcoin-mining-tool/#comment-3693794894

    A site doesn't necessarily know from where an IP come from, so they guess based, for example, on the language used by the people.

  • I don't believe that all the sites that display this issue (NYT, Wash. Post, Huffpost, Politico, etc) have so many Russian or Norwegian language visitors that they need to display ads in those languages.
    Am I the only one who has that problem?

  • @esebm said in This video is restricted from playing in your location:

    I don't believe that all the sites that display this issue (NYT, Wash. Post, Huffpost, Politico, etc) have so many Russian or Norwegian language visitors that they need to display ads in those languages. ...

    When you use a proxy/VPN, the final IP number sent to the sought website will be that of the selected exit server associated with the proxy/VPN service being used. Ordinarily, the website can location-check that IP before responding with geo-specific webpages and/or ads.

    If the website responds with an inappropriate geo-specific page or ads, it will be because either the geo-listing for the final IP that was consulted by the site has incorrect/inexact location data or because the proxy/VPN service is using a server that is not actually at the user-selected exit location. In some cases, if the exit proxy/VPN server IP location is not fully or properly documented in the IP listings, the website may guess at the location based on IP ownership records or such, and that can result in a webpage or ad response targeted for the geographic region thought to be served by the IP operator's recorded corporate location/address.

  • @esebm The ads are usually provided by third party services, that may be getting the wrong info on the IP address.

  • @blackbird71
    Thanks for the detailed answer.
    Let me try to understand it (at 72 years of age one does get a little dense at times): Using the Opera VPN one would assume that the exit server with the final IP is an Opera-owned one here in the Americas. I would understand if I'd see the occasional ad in one of the, I believe, 4 languages of our hemisphere. But it makes no sense to me that I have seen only Russian and Norwegian language ads.

  • @esebm said in This video is restricted from playing in your location:

    @blackbird71
    Let me try to understand it ...: Using the Opera VPN one would assume that the exit server with the final IP is an Opera-owned one here in the Americas. I would understand if I'd see the occasional ad in one of the, I believe, 4 languages of our hemisphere. But it makes no sense to me that I have seen only Russian and Norwegian language ads.

    If the 'Americas' exit server's IP look-up listing being used by the website/ad-clients is not accurate, complete, or specific, a website or its ad clients might then have to guess at where the IP's server is located - and one of the ways of guessing is to attribute the location to the IP-listed address of the server's owner/operator. If, for example, that operator information referred to Opera in Norway, then languages common to the Scandinavian/Northwestern Russian region might be inferred as common regional languages for the IP being used by the exit server.

    Another possibility might be that, for some reason, the 'Americas' exit server is not actually being employed for your proxy/VPN connection, but instead an Opera regional Scandinavian exit server is being employed for some reason, then a similar site/ad-client regional response could occur.

    At this distance, there remains genuine conjecture regarding the exact cause for what you're seeing. Manually pulling up server IP listing information can in many cases illustrate incomplete listed information, confusing information (sometimes the IPs are listed simply as entire IP blocks or under the name of contracted organizations headquartered in unrelated locales), or information that varies for a given IP between different IP look-up listing organizations. For example, the IP typically assigned to my system by my ISP usually shows up as located at 4 or 5 different locations within a 200-mile radius of my actual location, depending on which IP listing I manually pull down or as my geo-location as determined by a particular website I'm visiting (which has to be via IP lookup, since I forcibly suppress all on-board computer/internal geo-location software and data transfer from my systems).

  • @esebm dunno if this will matter but might.. depending on - When ya 1st installed your opera.. where did ya download opera from..

  • #nvmjustagirl
    I first installed Opera from their website in the '90ties when I had to pay 60 bucks just to get rid of the ads in the top right corner.
    #blackbird71
    Every time I check my IP address it comes from an Opera-owned server here in the US, from New England to California, all over the map. Maybe the operator information should not point to Norway but to some North Amercian Opera-owned entity.
    This morning I checked an American YouTube video and the commercial at the start was in the Russian language. It's getting old.
    Thanks again for all the input.
    Ed

  • @esebm nevermind.. i worded that question wrong.. lol

  • I couldn't confirm the problem. Same situation (version and VPN settings etc.) except in Michigan instead of Texas.