Why did you abandon opera 12 concepts?

  • I've been using opera for some 15 years. I also use other web browsers in parallel for some tasks, but I use Opera the most. As many users, I use opera because it has some features than other browsers do not have and because it has different look and feel. However, it is not true for the new versions. So every time I install/reinstall Windows, I get surprised anew with the newest version of Opera, and then quickly revert to Opera 12.

    My question is why did you decide to make your product similar to other existing products, when you already had your originality and your customer base who respected it? Why did you try to compete with much larger companies on their field? It really doesn't seem to me like a sound business strategy, but I still hope that it pays out for you because you've been providing me with some quality free software for a loooong time.

    Regards,
    Milos

  • Google "The vision behind Opera 15 and beyond" article. The most of users simply don't need feature-rich and highly customizable web-browser. Additional functions and options can frustrate average users or beginners.
    The other reason is that Google now has almost total monopoly over worlds browsers market ("Everything is chrome in the future" (C) ).

  • Of course the open source Chromium project is notionally still independent of Google.
    It just so happened that Google's own branded browser, Google Chrome, was based on it.
    Because of that it has become a bit of a world standard, and that's why Opera presumably decided to adopt it as the engine for its new generation of browsers after its own engine, Presto, became too difficult and expensive to maintain.
    🙂

  • In that sense, even Vivaldi uses Blink - though it runs more as an app with the interface rendered by the browser engine.

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