Opera has lost contact with customers

  • I know I might be banned from all discussions with this comment, but it really bothers me, that Opera is not considering customer feedbacks any more. As a business rule of thumb they are not getting salaries form their bosses or Opera AS, but the customers, so this is a huge mistake.

    The problems are:

    • many of us are complaining about not having the most useful functions of the Presto Operas any more in the new versions
    • they do not consider complaints about not having WP8 browser
    • they do not give any e-mail address or ticketing system for customers
    • they do not pay attention to Facebook comments
    • they released a browser that is a mere copy of the spy software called Chrome, but does have lot less features
    • they do not comment on whether they are or are not planning to release 64-bit Opera in the future
    • they do not care if they lose long-time customers and FANS of Opera like me

    But - since the Opera guys will never read this (they learned from Skype or what?) - I am asking: What do you think about it? Have they lost it?

    **Considering all the information above I can only think of one thing: they are preparing the scene to sell the company for cheap. That is miserable.
    **

  • Originally posted by tgaal:

    Have they lost it?

    No. I think you have lost it. Please spare us the large print and the melodrama.

    Unless you have created a new username, because you fear that you will get banned, you are apparently not a fan of Opera because the true fans have been helping other Opera users to resolve issues in these forums for many years — not just whining about their pet issues.

    Do some reading of the many threads over the last year or so since the first announcements about the change from the Presto rendering engine to Blink, and the announcements in the Desktop Team blogs, where there has been plenty of feedback and comments by the developers.

    Future plans are rarely announced until they are imminent.

    There is little to be gained from a 64-bit version of Opera, since each tab now runs in a separate process.

    There is a closed bug tracking system where users can submit tickets to report bugs, but it's not the place for feature requests — the Desktop Wish-list is the right place for that.

  • You did not understand a word from what I wrote. Sad...

  • Originally posted by tgaal:

    You did not understand a word from what I wrote. Sad...

    Actually, you're the one who doesn't yet understand. At least, not fully.

    Opera has always obtained its feedback primarily from polite comments and suggestions in its various developer/version blogs and bug reports. That dates back to the dawn of Opera. These browser forums exist (as they always have) primarily for Opera users to help other Opera users with problems or usage questions, and any developer "traffic" here is in response to topics raised by posters that lie within the skill area of the occasionally-browsing developer. Raising mere complaining threads here is simply not going to get any meaningful attention or response from Opera ASA, because they don't come here for anything approaching that purpose. It's been explained over and over again by those who try to help in these forums, but it just doesn't seem to register: merely complaining in these forums about Opera versions is as pointless as going outside and shouting to the stars at night. Pehaps less so, because shouting at the stars at least gives one a therapeutic ventilation. All attempts at convoluted interpretations of the forum rules to justify mere complaining here will not change a basic reality: Opera is not listening to the complaint threads raised in these forums.

    If Opera ASA does not listen to complaints here, what is the rational point of continuing to complain here?

  • You explain things so clearly and patiently, blackbird71, but it never seems to register. I truly welcome the purging of the forums although what will be left is anyone's guess. Hopefully with MyOpera dismantled and the relief from SPAM, more time can be devoted to answering user questions and ridding the forums of useless noise.

  • OK. Thank you both. Now I understand. I was wrong and everything is OK with Opera. All we have to do is switch to another browser. I am sorry to see a really good browser deteriorate, because I was a real fan of it since 2002. But you both are right. The problem is with me, who wants things, functions and features that were part of Opera before, but they do not want to have them any more. Sorry for my (and many other user's) "special" requests.

    And I am not a developer. I have been a devoted user. So I can not "make things better by giving solutions" - I do not have to. I will act according to what the two of you have wrote and forget Opera. Although my heart breaks for it. Not that anyone should care - you are right with that again.

  • Exactly everything what tgaal wrote stands for me. It is something pretty wrong if you have so many post of long time users who are simply sad because they have to use now quite old versions, while the new one appear to miss functionalities which made me to use Opera as a most favorable browser in the first place. I am not a developer, I am simply the user. And I will use Opera for some more time, hoping that some of normal, useful appeals from long time users catch attention.

  • Originally posted by Pesala:

    There is little to be gained from a 64-bit version of Opera, since each tab now runs in a separate process.

    Not true. Things should be moving toward 64-bit, not away. Because of programs refusing to switch from 32-bit, OSes are forced to keep emulation software around for years. Windows for example has WoW64, Linux requires 32-bit libraries. Current versions of Windows can no longer run 16-bit programs because developers have migrated away from it over the years, that needs to happen at some point for 32-bit to reduce bulk associated with 32-bit libraries.

    Also, I run 64-bit Java for ImageJ and Matlab (they use Java for their interface), so I need a 64-bit browser to work with that Java. Having multiple versions of Java on my system is a pain in the ass as you have to constantly maintain the Java target directories and maintain two different sets of updates. Having 32-bit Java is a huge inconvenience to me and not something I should have to deal with.

    Not having 64-bit is a big mistake in my opinion.

  • Originally posted by Synbios:

    ... Things should be moving toward 64-bit, not away. Because of programs refusing to switch from 32-bit, OSes are forced to keep emulation software around for years. Windows for example has WoW64, Linux requires 32-bit libraries. ... I run 64-bit Java for ImageJ and Matlab (they use Java for their interface), so I need a 64-bit browser to work with that Java. Having multiple versions of Java on my system is a pain ... Not having 64-bit is a big mistake in my opinion.

    Eventually, we'll probably all agree. I remember somewhat similar things occurring and the frustrations in the shift from 16-bit to 32-bit structures back in the early days... but that evolved quicker, probably because the gains to be had from migration were so evident at the state (and limitations) of technology in those days, plus the hardware lent itself to the shift more readily.

    The problem, of course, is that we all must live in the present, and the "present" is where a 64-bit version of Webkit/Blink has not yet come to be. Consequently, there's not a 64-bit engine there for Opera to build upon. Your only choice at present is to find a 64-bit browser that works with your array of software and make the best of it.

  • Originally posted by blackbird71:

    the "present" is where a 64-bit version of Webkit/Blink has not yet come to be.

    Hm? I've been using it for years.

  • Originally posted by Frenzie:

    Originally posted by blackbird71:

    the "present" is where a 64-bit version of Webkit/Blink has not yet come to be.

    Hm? I've been using it for years.

    On Windows?

  • There is a 64-bit version of both Chromium and Chrome for Linux. There is a 64-bit version of Chromium for Windows.
    http://chromium.woolyss.com/#windows

    The only thing missing is 64-bit version of Chrome for Windows. If Opera wanted to separate itself from Chrome more and offer a feature that Google/Chrome doesn't already, making a 64-bit version of Opera from the 64-bit Chromium would be perfect.

  • I think it's great that Opera want to move with the times and update the look and feel of their browser, and okay they have used open source software as the basis for the new browser.

    but

    this gives you access to all the extensions already made for Chrome, by adding one little extension.

    not such a bad thing!

    On the down side why there is no "sync" on Windows XP is beyond me.

    It really p***** me off that they would leave a huge chunk of the community out in the cold.

    sort it out and it could be a great browser once again!

    My ten cents don't take it personal.

    regards,

    `cosmo

  • Originally posted by DeMarcoBg:

    Exactly everything what tgaal wrote stands for me. It is something pretty wrong if you have so many post of long time users who are simply sad because they have to use now quite old versions, while the new one appear to miss functionalities which made me to use Opera as a most favorable browser in the first place. I am not a developer, I am simply the user. And I will use Opera for some more time, hoping that some of normal, useful appeals from long time users catch attention.

    I agree 100%.
    Version 12.x will remain installed on all of my desktops for the foreseeable future.

  • Originally posted by tgaal:

    You did not understand a word from what I wrote. Sad...

    i do. i think the reason is because of money. they're struggling to survive. they could not keep pace with the development of webkit/blink, so they were forced to join it - it's not that they necessarily wanted to dump their presto baby and all of their features, they couldn't afford to fight google anymore. lack of dialogue is also indicative of finances. in 2011,2012 they lost money. 2013 (blink year) they came out of the red. their stock price seems to really have jumped up with blink too.

  • So meh, it really saddened me to see Opera Unite disappear. With a bit of more work, would have turned Opera into THE browser to have. Right now I'm using Maxthon for most of the time and turning back to Opera a few times a month to check updates on both 12.x and the Alpha/Beta/failed-Crome-copyacat/whatever-you-call-it-that-silly-version-without-bookmarks.

    If they can't maintain the Community features at least, then I am sure Opera will disappear in two years max. I'd really love to see it stay but I can't deny what I see. A real pity...

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