How long do you think that Opera 12.xx can stay useful in a post 15+ world?

  • I'm still using opera 12.64 daily.

    With an SSD/Ramdrive, it keeps the slowness tolerable.

    For some reason, web compatability is still ok.

    I have a system set up to use it with a Iron (chrome) browser.

    It's tolerable, but I wonder when the internet will move too far forward for 12.xx to be functional.

  • Opera has considerably slower JavaScript performance (high CPU usage). Using a ramdrive for cache does not solve that issue. But a fast cache on a dedicated drive is good for any browser. It's generally better to keep temporary files out of the profile directory. How long will Opera remain useful depends on what sites you visit.

    There already are sites, which do not work acceptably in Opera, and their count will grow. Gamespot.com recently updated with a much more complex layoyt and is unacceptable for use in Opera. While discussion forums like HydrogenAudio.org and Doom9.org still use previous site engines, and they remain fast. Other forums like GTAForums or MSFN, slowed down their sites a couple times for no better reason than to "appear modern". I'd give Opera about a year of productive life for "most" users.

  • Originally posted by j7nj7n:

    I'd give Opera about a year of productive life for "most" users.

    I suppose it depends on what you are willing to accept from its growing incompatibility. I agree that a year at most is probably the best that can be hoped for... perhaps less. Hopefully by then the new version will contain those features that the holdouts require.

  • I figure I can use 12.64 for at least 2 more more years.

    I've had experience with this before, used DOS 5.0 + 4dos for years, then used Win 3.1 forever.

  • As I posted before, I think there is no real one-answer-fits-all for this question. It depends on the individual and what he is willing to accept. I will only go so far with any browser. The moment it becomes an inconvenience, I drop it until such time as the "issue" is resolved (i.e. FF has a font glitch right now with Windows 8.1 and therefore I refuse to use it until that is corrected). The problem with Presto is, the compatibility issues will not be fixed and will only become greater over time. There has to come a point at which you say: enough it enough. Time to look elsewhere.

  • Originally posted by leushino:

    As I posted before, I think there is no real one-answer-fits-all for this question. It depends on the individual and what he is willing to accept.

    Oh so true. I'm very stubborn and set in my ways (Browsing habits) that I'm willing to stick it out for a long time. My buddy is just the opposite, first sign of incompatibility in Opera (Years ago) and he bolted.

  • Probably for quite a while, my version of Opera 12.16 still says "You are using the latest version of Opera" if I go to help, check for updates, I thought that was weird, which is why I went to the main Opera site myself. Installed version 18.0 to the same location, and now I have Launcher.exe that launches Opera 18, whilst Opera.exe still launches 12.16. I've been using Opera since around 2000 when I was trying to find a decent web browser for Linux. Pretty much used it ever since, because I much preferred it to FF. Likely going to switch to FF or chrome now though, since they dropped the Presto engine for Blink. Plus HTML 5 video's wont load for me in YouTube in Opera 18.0 but they do in 12.16

    I remember using Dos 6.22/Win 3.11fw for years though, and not really understanding all the fuss about Windows 95 at the time it came out.

  • How long is a piece of string ?.

    If you frequent a lot of these bloated, heavy (feature rich ??? Ha ha ha, yeah right) popular sites, such as Farcebook, twatter and a great deal of news and (social???) media sites, then be prepared for support and Opera Classics (Presto) usefulness to drop like a stone. If you don't (like me), then it's (Opera Classics (Presto)) usefulness could last way into the future.

  • Originally posted by LinuxMint7:

    If you frequent a lot of these bloated, heavy (feature rich ??? Ha ha ha, yeah right) popular sites, such as Farcebook, twatter and a great deal of news and (social???) media sites, then be prepared for support and Opera Classics (Presto) usefulness to drop like a stone.

    Hey, for those 'popular' sites you don't need a browser. A dumbed down content viewer will suffice, Google Chrome being an excellent choice.

  • Or Opium, called via the Open With menu, which, unlike Chrome, can be easily installed in portable mode and prevented from updating (downloading and installing unauthorized software).

    In the past, even "traditional" sites have upgraded to look modern, requiring a much faster browser, or, even if they're fast enough, may have a vital part broken in older browsers. There are a few sites which would perform fast enough in Opera 8, except that the login form doesn't work anymore. Newly established certificate issuers, unknown to Opera, will eventually render browsing inconvienient with prompts for approval, especially for non-technical people.

    It should be possible to lighten up some sites by filtering advertisements or useless widgets/apps from them. If that can be done, the old Opera might even be faster than Opium, which does not have a content blocker. But for users who can't edit Urlfilter, the next six months might be the timeframe during which their browser must be updated. Imagine Aunt Gertrude before the intimidating dialog about an unknown security certificate.

    Originally posted by lmcgregoruk:

    I remember using Dos 6.22/Win 3.11fw for years though, and not really understanding all the fuss about Windows 95 at the time it came out.

    Windows 4.x become useful with Windows 98 release. By that time computers finally had enough memory to run it smoothly, and DirectX had completely replaced DOS as a gaming platform.

  • Originally posted by LinuxMint7:

    If you don't (like me), then it's (Opera Classics (Presto)) usefulness could last way into the future.

    Actually the so-called mobile Facebook site is in many ways better even in Chrome. :right: So you might have to make some concessions if you like those sites, but they wouldn't necessarily become unusable.

  • I'll carry on using Opera 12 until there are security issues. Over many many years of using Opera as my default I've got used to opening some sites in Firefox or IE so carrying on doing that isn't going to bother me.

    Originally posted by LinuxMint7:

    How long is a piece of string ?.

    If you frequent a lot of these bloated, heavy (feature rich ??? Ha ha ha, yeah right) popular sites, such as Farcebook, twatter and a great deal of news and (social???) media sites, then be prepared for support and Opera Classics (Presto) usefulness to drop like a stone. If you don't (like me), then it's (Opera Classics (Presto)) usefulness could last way into the future.

    Many 'big' sites have never officially supported Opera anyway. Try telling any of them that there's a problem with their site and mention you're using Opera, I was told by Asda last week that my browser was unsupported and to upgrade to the latest version of IE (which they said was 8).

  • I'm still using opera 12.64 daily.

    Opera 12.64 ?
    I’m using Opera 12.16 (1860) and I thought it was the last windows version.

  • Opera 12.64 ?
    I’m using Opera 12.16 (1860) and I thought it was the last windows version.

    It is, there has never been a 12.64 version of desktop Opera, or any other Opera AFAIK.

    12.16 is the latest (last?) version of Presto based Opera for Windows.
    😞

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