Opera Blink Does Not Allow Dragging Address Bar Icon To Desktop Or Any Folder

  • Chrome can do it. Comodo Dragon can do it. IE can do it. Old Opera (Presto) could do it. Why can't Opera Blink do it? This is a stupid limitation and is one of the main things preventing me from using Opera regularly.

  • If you activate your Personal bookmarks rar -- Alt P., and choose Show bookmarks bar -- it will be a horizontal bar on the top of the browser. You can then drag the icon on the left of the Address bar to the Personal bookmarks bar and create a bookmark. However it in the folder is a separate action of dragging that bookmark to your folder. Not hard, but . . .

    Now there's an excellent Opera extension, called Add Bookmark, which makes it even easier. With that extension, when you click on the Add Bookmark icon, and choose make a bookmark, it shows you all your folders, and you can select where you want to put the bookmark. It even lets you make a new folder for the bookmark. It's all rather seamless there.

    Now in moving from Opera Presto to Opera Blink, Opera has had to start from scratch and reprogram everything. It's still in the process of reprogramming. So maybe every jot and tittle 😉 isn't there at this very moment, but it's still -- for me -- quite an impressive browser, once you get the hang of all of the possibilities with it.

  • Thanks for the suggested workaround, but it requires too much time/effort for the purpose. You have to take 4 steps instead of just 1. Regarding the use of the Add Bookmark extension, that's also too much trouble for the purpose, and also I don't use extensions, which is one of the main reasons Presto was my primary browser for @ 12 years.

  • Not 4 steps but 2. You drag the address bar icon to the personal bookmarks bar, and then from there drag it to a folder. You could argue you have to make a folder too, if you don't have one ready. Not much time and effort really. But look Opera Blink is designed to work with extensions. If you won't use any extensions, even something as simple and basic as Add Bookmark, then you simply can't be made happy. But IMHO you should not point a finger at Opera Blink. You're the reason you can't be happy. And then, no question, you're much better off staying with Opera Presto -- which is a fine browser. Now if the Opera developer added the functionality of Add Bookmark to its native Opera blink browser, that would be okay with me too. I would actually like it, and by the way, Opera is planning to add bookmark functionality in Opera 23, by having an icon you can click to add page to the bookmarks bar.

    Opera Blink was designed and intended for users to add extensions to it, and, in that way, to make the browser whole and useful. To view and critique Opera Blink on how it performs without any extensions misses the whole point of what the developer was doing with the browser. Because it wasn't really intended for such a constricted use! It would be an unfair test. Now, I'm more than happy using the Add Bookmark extension to make things easier for me. As well as other extensions. I say: bring them on 🙂 The Opera review criteria are fairly extensive. http://dev.opera.com/extensions/tut_publishing_guidelines.html. Opera has reviewed the Add Bookmark extension, looked at the code, and deems it as adding fuctionality.

  • ... also I don't use extensions, which is one of the main reasons Presto was my primary browser for @ 12 years.

    If you "don't use extensions", you may find yourself very limited in browser choices at this point in history. Like them or not, extensions seem to be the way features/customizations are now implemented across most browsers. Just sayin'...

  • Thanks, blackbird. I always appreciate your perspective on things. I may indeed have to change my position on this, but I'm gonna hold out as long as I can. ;^)

  • @fluxrev, you're welcome. I see both the pros and cons of browser extensions, but as I mentioned, either way the current reality is simply that most browsers now employ them for a lot of things that used to be built-in. The one difference seems to be that the Chrome line of browsers (and all its offspring) use separate processes for each extension, and the Firefox line of browsers (and all its offspring) doesn't... for whatever that may matter to a user.

  • The main issue for me is security. Compatibility problems (i.e., browser updates breaking extensions) don't really concern me, assuming that I would only be using a very small number of extensions and they were ones that provided functions that I truly needed. Regarding security as it relates to Chrome, I can't assess the extent to which restricting extensions to the Chrome Web Store prevents the distribution of malicious extensions. (I don't know, by the way, what Opera's policy is on third-party extensions or, more importantly, what sort of security Opera provides with respect to the extensions hosted on their extension site.)

  • I did provide a link to the Opera guidelines for extensions. In it are the acceptance criterion.

    http://dev.opera.com/extensions/tut_publishing_guidelines.html#acceptance-criteria

    My understanding is that Opera gives gives a more rigorous review/vetting to it's extensions than Google has to Chrome extensions, at least as of a year ago. http://browserfame.com/1928/chrome-vs-opera. I believe I read somewhere that Chrome was going to toughen up its review. I don't know what the current situation is.

    The approach I try to take, particularly for Chrome extensions, is to review comments by users of the extension, and also to search for reviews on the internet. Often if I find one, and it's relevant to a post, I pass along the review to this forum. Now some of the extensions like the Opera extension, "Add Bookmark," seem very basic, and I don't over-think that one. Now it's easy enough to disable an extension or uninstall it. So it's nice to test and decide if one finds it useful.

    One aspect that's nice with extensions is that it's easy enough to go to the developer at the website for the extension, and explain a concern, ask about a feature you would like, etc. The developers I have talked with are very open to making the product better, and are very forthcoming when issues/concerns are raised. I often get very quick feedback from developers of the extensions (some by exchange of personal emails). It's lot harder to get a reaction from Opera at a personal level to concerns I may have. There's no one to write to (via email), other than maybe the Suggestion forum, and it's rare to get a personal reaction (meaning something specifically written for me, in response to a post) from anyone in Opera.

  • If security relating to extensions is a concern, don't use extensions. 🙂

    As for myself, I severely limit the number of extensions and with the exception of one, all are from Opera. As for the matter of the plethora of built-in features in the former Presto version, my guess is that will likely never see the light of day again... on any browser.

  • As for the matter of the plethora of built-in features in the former Presto version, my guess is that will likely never see the light of day again... on any browser.

    Agreed. Fortunately, I'm not in need of that plethora. I don't think, however, that it's too much to expect that Opera Blink would provide the ability to drag the address bar icon to the Desktop or a folder natively. Aside from the fact that the other browsers I mentioned do this, I would ask, is this particular capability really the sort of thing that should require an extension? What next, the need to install an extension to save webpages?

  • If security relating to extensions is a concern, don't use extensions. 🙂
    As for myself, I severely limit the number of extensions and with the exception of one, all are from Opera.

    I severely limit my extensions also. I have 17 Opera extensions right now, and four Chrome ones active 🙂

  • I severely limit my extensions also. I have 17 Opera extensions right now, and four Chrome ones active 🙂

    17 extensions is "severely" limited? You're kidding, right?

  • ;))) The browser is still very fast. A lot of the plugins are basic things, or simply to add functionality. If I have a slowdown of speed, I can deactivate everything, and test to find the problem.

    A lot of the extensions are very basic or essential. The Opera Extensions: Add Bookmark (filling the gap of what Opera does not yet provide in the native browser), Adblock Plus (nice ad-blocker), Classic Tabs (makes the tab behavior like Presto), Clearly {helps reading, by giving better contrast, night mode, etc.), Disconnect (important security), Disconnect Search (also very important security), Extension Source Viewer (I'm playing with this now. The alternative is the Opera created extension, called Download Chrome Extension, which is also quite good) (either of these help make it possible to install a Chrome Extension in Opera), Feedly (superb rss reader), Gmail Checker (mail is essential), Gmailius (improves gmail, really good), Google Translator (one needs at least one translator), HTMS Everywhere (security), PDF Viewer (I want to read pdfs in Opera tabs), Speed Dial for YouTube, Stumble Upon (wonderful for the Speed Dial, because it changes the display every five seconds), Turn Off the Lights (nice for YouTube videos, by cutting out background light, and making it like a movie theater), User Agent Switch (to thwart those browser sniffing sites).

    The Chrome Extensions: Chrookmarks for Chrome (a bookmarks Manager) (really good, with the only competition for me, Neater Bookmarks, which I have on my browser, but deactivated right now, or maybe Tidy Bookmarks for Chrome), One Click Extension Manager (you can deactivate all of your extensions with one click, or do it on a case by case basis), Sexy Undo Close Tab, (one I could cut or deactivate I guess, but I like it, so we'll see), Click & Clean (also I could deactivate it, and I'm ambivalent here, but it does a lot, malware scans, cookie treatment -- saving some, not others -- cleaning history in many different ways, etc. Maybe I'll deactivate Sexy Undo Close Tab and Click & Clean if I find some more extensions I want to add. And maybe 🙂 I won't.

    The extensions above seem very basic to me, or meet needs, and I think they are worth taking the risk on to make the browser fun and exciting. And the overall browser performance is still quite good for me.

    I have a number of other extensions deactivated. I could uninstall them, but I still might use them again, and I don't want to forget them. They're in a place analogous to limbo. Maybe I'll bring them back, maybe I'll delete them.

    I don't want this to get out of control. Still, without extensions, the browser is not very usable or fun to me. It was designed to be used with extensions.

    I just don't think people should be so spartan with extensions -- and perhaps, paranoid:) -- that they destroy their pleasure in using the browser. I'd say take a chance, and if you're unhappy, then deactivate or uninstall.

  • The extensions above seem very basic to me, or meet needs, and I think they are worth taking the risk on to make the browser fun and exciting.

    To each his own, but "basic" is one thing, and "fun and exciting" is something else. The fact that you would talk about these very different qualities as if they were entirely harmonious indicates confused, non-serious thinking about the issues, as does your "take a chance, and if you're unhappy, then deactivate or uninstall" policy.

  • To each his own, but "basic" is one thing, and "fun and exciting" is something else. The fact that you would talk about these very different qualities as if they were entirely harmonious indicates confused, non-serious thinking about the issues, as does your "take a chance, and if you're unhappy, then deactivate or uninstall" policy.

    Haha. Nonesense. I'm very. serious about my goals, and what I want in a browser. I'm not just looking for functionality. I want basic functionality for me AND enjoyable (which includes the aesthetic). You may be serious about you want, but you seem to me confused in judging another person (and whether their thinking is serious) because you appear to make that determination based on what you think is important in the browser. Am I no longer a serious person, because I also want the browser to give me pleasure? Now I must confess, I do use youTube, Daily Motion.com, Slacker, Pandora, watch TV out of the speed dial, use the stumbleUpon extension in the speed Dial. I mean, does the browser have to be all balance sheets and geek stuff? And the appearance of the platform by which the browser provides the basic functionality AND pleasurable things is important to me. The wonderful minimalist look of Opera Blink is sufficiently important to me that I can even accept not having a few features. Does a comparison of browsers have to be simply an accounting balance sheet of which provides the most features? That loses the aesthetic, it loses the soul . . .

    As for taking a chance, we make the best judgment we can, and then we all take a chances every day in our lives to some extent. And those who hardly take a chance at all are often the most miserable. I've listed extensions that work for me, and that I'm happy with. With all of those extension that I'm using, my Opera Blink browser performance is wonderful. My list of extensions changes from day to day. Now I know better what I want, than you know what I want. And if you somehow presume to think you know what I should want in a browser, then I would find you to be not a serious thinker.

    In the end, you have to look at yourself, ask what you want in a browser, research what's out there, and then to some extent (because nothing is 100 percent) you have to be willing to take a chance. Why, I'd say (if you're using this Blink browser, made to be fulfilled via extension), go ahead, download the damn extension at some point after researching it, and seeing that it looks promising to you, would fill a need if it works right, would make you happier. And if you are never prepared to do that, to at least test it, then accept being miserable.

  • I stand by the statements of mine that you quoted. Indeed, your attempt to refute my point only underscores it.

    Your conclusion that a user should "go ahead, download the damn extension at some point after researching it, or if not ever, . . . accept being miserable" is ludicrous, though in a way that is characteristic of the era we live in (as the over-the-top levels of outrage and teeth-gnashing regarding Opera Blink on the previous incarnation of this forum showed). "Miserable"? Because of the lack of extensions in a web browser? I find some choices that developers make annoying, but I wouldn't let the complete absence of a browser---and therefore the Internet, too---make me "miserable". Anyway, have fun with your extensions---I'm done here.

  • Your conclusion that a user should "go ahead, download the damn extension at some point after researching it, or if not ever, . . . accept being miserable" is ludicrous, though in a way that is characteristic of the era we live in

    What I said was slightly more nuanced: "In the end, you have to look at yourself, ask what you want in a browser, research what's out there, and then to some extent (because nothing is 100 percent) you have to be willing to take a chance. Why, I'd say (if you're using this Blink browser, made to be fulfilled via extension), go ahead, download the damn extension at some point after researching it, and seeing that it looks promising to you, would fill a need if it works right, would make you happier. And if you are never prepared to do that, to at least test it, then accept being miserable.

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