General Chat

  • Readmitted to the hospital on the 5th, I was performed with biopsy Tuesday the 10th. Home again, awaiting for the results, to get re-re-admitted for the third time - they're going to scratch my bone in any case, good if no parts removing, yikes. The doctor says when doing the bio, it might not have been resembling the ^bad^ though; however it says in my release paper, the extension seems several centimeters so it might seem I'm up to some pain one way or another.
    He treated my arm very well, however; feeling o'k, much better now. :coffee:

  • In such contexts, "bad" is malignant while "good" is benign. Just helping with the English there.

  • Are they treating you aggressively with antibiotics? From what I understand, that's usually indicated for treating such a problem, perhaps with some additional measures, since it's often related to something like a deep strep infection at a site.

  • In such contexts, "bad" is malignant while "good" is benign. Just helping with the English there.

    "Evil" ;)

    Yeah, Black.
    ABs, let alone some cutting in July to release the phlegm (like a shaft in my meat where they mostly put some unsolvable "lace" to let it stay open, because the inflammation wouldn't stop).
    In July, they didn't find why. Now they thought they did. They - at last - seem to have pumped out the phlegm and quelled the inflammation; and I was performed with tomography etc. where they find likes of it being malignant.
    My doctor though, as I must have mentioned already, said it didn't resemble %bad% much when they biopsied me.

    PS: "Awaiting" is, of course, transitive, sorry about that*;)*

  • Readmitted to the hospital on the 5th, I was performed with biopsy Tuesday the 10th. Home again, awaiting for the results, to get re-re-admitted for the third time - they're going to scratch my bone in any case, good if no parts removing, yikes. The doctor says when doing the bio, it might not have been resembling the ^bad^ though; however it says in my release paper, the extension seems several centimeters so it might seem I'm up to some pain one way or another.
    He treated my arm very well, however; feeling o'k, much better now.

    I broke the arm in that very place just making an energetic move. A piece of shit of a neighbour from 2 floor had made our house a dove territory - I was upset and moved against one trying to flap IN the building.
    ER took me to the hospital, I waited, then a traumatologist somehow immobilised it with pink gypsum.
    Yep, it's cancer. So that I wouldn't be TOO happy with the pink...

    :confused: , the Hong-Cola gist (I don't know the English word spelling anyway) said it's not malignant. However, he barely even looked at the papers and he acted veeeery peculiarly.
    (Things getting peculiarlier and peculiarlier. /Alice;)
    Well, got a pass or what do you call it: consultation with a trauma surgeon in a Moscow clinic. This next Monday.
    (I hate travelling -- except I'm in charge;)

  • The English word is oncologist, as in on-colo-gist. A key factor working for you is not having it be malignant... which means it's far less likely to spread throughout the body. Usually malignancy is determined by microscopic examination of the cancer cell shape and structure to determine the type of cancer (which is why they did the biopsy), so my guess is that the oncologist simply looked at the lab report and noted the non-malignancy. Had it been malignant, time usually becomes critically important to get surgery, chemo, and/or radiation started before the cancer cells spread. If it's non-malignant, things frequently move at a slower pace unless the cancer is in a vital organ that needs immediate attention.

  • Not that breaking bones is fun, but it generally doesn't kill you.

  • Breaking an already chewed bone?
    Breaking a bone when you've got other health issues?

    Black, are you saying there is a "good" cancer and a ^bad^ cancer??? :confused:


    It's flashing!
    It's not a trauma surgeon, it's cancer surgeon now (oncologist).
    Well, isn't it funny? First attempt of our local onc to send me mother called and was told "we only do legs"; now I called, and a major guy told me they didn't do bones, "though come, I'll see you".
    (:

  • Proper English word would be tumor, which means an unusual growth. A tumor may or may not be cancer. But I think he was saying there is bad cancer and worse cancer, really.

  • Sorry for the delay in responding; I've been away for a couple of weeks. A number of my family and friends, as well as myself, have had fair experience dealing with both benign and true cancer growths at points in our lives.

    There are a number of terms for abnormal cell growths, sometimes not used very precisely. Such abnormal growths can involve a variety of characteristics, and if or when a growth satisfies enough commonly-recognized characteristic categories, it is technically termed 'cancer' or 'malignant'; if not, the growth is typically termed 'benign'. Many types of malignant cells have been medically recognized and can be identified quickly via microscopic or other analysis of a biopsy sample. If the malignant cells are capable of aggressively spreading into other tissue cell types and locations in the body, the growths are termed 'metastatic'. When a growth remains in place, is non-metastatic, and only very slowly enlarges over time, even certain cancer types are sometimes also termed 'benign'. Hence, in common usage, there can be a blurring of terminology. I've seen both usages of the word benign, so only your doctors can tell you accurately what they meant by what they told you since only they have studied the biopsy results.

    Most medical people will assert that any kind of abnormal cell growth, even a truly benign one, has a potential to evolve or alter into a true cancer eventually, some types far more readily than others. Since cell abnormalities are just that - abnormal - they indicate something has changed within a cell that is causing it and its offspring to be peculiar. It has long been medically observed that cells that are abnormal have a greater potential for increasing their types and kind of abnormalities once they start down the path of abnormality; and since cells have the ability to replicate themselves, certain benign abnormal growths could eventually evolve into invasive abnormalities - what we call cancer.

    Consequently, all abnormal growths always bear careful watching for indications of alteration in what they're doing or how they appear. In some cases, either because of their location, the associated pain, or the historical likelihood that their cell type will eventually evolve into true cancer, such benign growths have to be dealt with, though there is not normally any need for urgent action. In most cases where the diagnosis of the abnormal growth is already cancer, because of the risks of further abnormality resulting in the cells metastasizing throughout the body, true cancer should be dealt with quickly and aggressively.

  • Hi, dudes!
    Thank you, Black!
    I had to go to the hospital for the third time now: yuck leaking in quantities and t~39C when I was admitted, phlegmona. The new, third doctors sliced me and diced me, now I'm more than a week home, kinda good. The fracture had already started to heal, however pathology must have remained in the bone, they removed the gypsum on the first day, now I wear a soft fixture instead. Certain muscles have grown "jammed" though due to this prolonged immobilisation, so here I've a dilemma: 1) I should move and exercise the arm, 2) I should keep the arm in the fixture.
    Awaiting a pass to see some special doctor in that special clinic in Moscow again - kinda. Should check on it every day, or every other day - as the "welcoming" doctor here in the policlinic/ambulatory said I could have my dressings skipping a day cause the wounds are dry and have been for some couple of weeks.

    So well, nutshell I'm home, feeling better.

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