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Would love to use VPN, but....

  • I have some local LAN sites on my work LAN, and Opera doesn't understand these, and can't get to them with the VPN enabled. I am forever having to switch the VPN on and off.

    Is there a setting to make this work?

  • Is there a setting to make this work?

    Give external access to your LAN so it can be reached by the VPN server.

  • Errm, no, VPN is supported to ENHANCE security, not totally destroy it..

  • Errm, no, VPN is supported to ENHANCE security, not totally destroy it..

    The only way VPN can see sites in your LAN is if you give it access to those sites.

  • Why in the world are you trying to connect to LAN segments with VPN? VPN functionality is access between point to point through a WAN.

    I don't think you understand what VPN is for.

  • I use my browser for BOTH, and have to keep switching the stupid thing on and off, making it essentially useless.

  • Maybe it's not the best solution but you may try with another Opera installation but as standalone and access those sites without VPN from that opera or with different profiles in the same installation.

  • You are not "securing" any connection when using a 3rd party VPN client, especially a browser VPN (proxy), when connecting to a LAN.

    Using a VPN on a LAN is pointless and absurd.

    LAN = Local Area Connection = intranet, internal network

    WAN = Wide Area Connection = internet, outside network, internet service provider (isp)

    Opera does NOT offer true VPN service, it's a marketing gimmick, it's essentially a proxy portal that is it.

    Your only alternative is to use a VPN client that connects via socket level and add rules. Still, using a VPN on a LAN is absurd.

  • Additionally, to help you understand what VPN is.

    https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc779919(v=ws.10).aspx

  • To be honest I can see where the OP is coming from and also understand the comment / confusion. After all: a TCP/IP based environment is capable of differentiating between local and remote through the use of the routing table. Local gets send out directly and everything else is send to the so called "default gateway" for further processing.

    I don't think this has much to do with not understanding how a VPN works but more so with a little confusion. I mean... Right now my PC is also connected to a VPN yet that doesn't mean that all my data is also send across this VPN.

    The issue at hand here is network level vs. application level, also known as the OSI model. If you follow the link you'll see what I mean. Basically Opera is an application, operating at the application level. It knows nothing about routing, name translation (DNS) and all that, all it does is present you with an option to access web sites and/or pages. In other words: you type in a name or IP address (the first usually gets translated to the latter) and then it'll try to connect to that address on port 80 (HTTP) or maybe 443 (HTTPS) or... you get the idea.

    It is incapable of dividing the data between local or remote, because that isn't its job. Sure, it can work. If you type in a local address then it'll (usually) contact that address directly. If you type in an unknown address (unknown to the local network) it'll try to contact the default gateway in order to reach it. Yet this functionality is set up through the systems routing table. On Windows see the "route print" command, on Linux "route", on BSD "netstat -r".

    So getting back to Opera's VPN... It is most certainly a real VPN in every sense of the word. The only problem is that this VPN operates on the application level and not the more commonly used network level (which is also where routing facilities reside). Once again, see that OSI model I linked to above.

    Ergo: all Opera will know about when you enable the VPN is "send all (web) data to the gateway". Its incapable of separating between local or remote because that could result in insecurity.

    However...

    My tests gives me other results. Note: I'm only using the VPN in a private browsing session. But when I try to contact a local IntraNet website (using a local domain) I'm still seeing that website. When I try to connect to http://10.x.x.y then it also works. Opera clearly tells me "VPN is disabled for this site to give you access to local content.".

    So right now I can't help wonder if your problems couldn't be caused by your set up and/or configuration and not so much Opera's VPN functionality.

  • My tests gives me other results. Note: I'm only using the VPN in a private browsing session. But when I try to contact a local IntraNet website (using a local domain) I'm still seeing that website. When I try to connect to http://10.x.x.y then it also works. Opera clearly tells me "VPN is disabled for this site to give you access to local content.".
    So right now I can't help wonder if your problems couldn't be caused by your set up and/or configuration and not so much Opera's VPN functionality.

    It happens accessing to the Router IP, it works and the VPN icon appears greyed out.

    Who knows which is the problem.

  • @shelluser

    opera's "vpn" is not vpn. it's a proxy integrated into the browser. completely different than what a client vpn does which encapsulates all data on a connection not just the browser. if you want to access local resources you either need to turn off the vpn or create rules. simple as that.

    apples to oranges.

  • Adding the server IP Address to the LMHosts could skips the VPN?

    It happens accessing to the Router IP, it works and the VPN icon appears greyed out.
    Who knows which is the problem.

    Since the router it's the DNS, this comment may have no sense... :rolleyes:

  • No. LMHOSTS is for Windows workgroups and domains not for outside traffic. The only way using LMhosts would work under a VPN connection is if the VPN server or computer on the other side of the VPN had services enabled to accept these connections. On top of that LMhosts is very old... it was there for token ring.

    The browser, afik, does not offer vpn "settings" and the browser "vpn" is NOT a VPN(!), Opera's VPN is a proxy that simple.

    To help you understand the differences between proxies and vpn:
    .

    https://www.google.com/search?client=opera&q=proxy+versus+vpn
    .
    https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&q=proxy+versus+vpn\

    The only work around is as you previously stated... create a new installation of the browser in a different path, or use a different browser.

  • So I am seeing the same as someone mentioned, local servers on my LAN if I access them by IP address, Opera is smart enough to know to disable the VPN for these. However if I enter the DNS name of the server, it doesn't know about it.

  • Actually, it's only if I use it's FQDN does it cause an issue. If I use it's local server DNS name, that's fine. Accessing it via mserver.mydomain.com is where the issue is.

  • No. LMHOSTS is for Windows workgroups and domains not for outside traffic.

    It was a thought because of this:

    local servers on my LAN if I access them by IP address, Opera is smart enough to know to disable the VPN for these.

    Despite just tested with the Router in a home network.

    Actually, it's only if I use it's FQDN does it cause an issue. If I use it's local server DNS name, that's fine. Accessing it via mserver.mydomain.com is where the issue is.

    Then,

    use it's local server DNS name, that's fine.

    you should use that option (if you can) to avoid switches and installs.

  • hosts file

    x.x.x.x any-name-you-want-to-identify-as

    https://www.google.com/#q=hosts+file&*

    that ought to work if opera notices a local network address. if not, then don't know since i don't use opera's proxy.

  • For me, the VPN works great for bypassing sites blocked by the router. It's set up like this on purpose so that Windows cannot leak crash reports and whatever telemetry.

    If Opera VPN cannot handle name server lookups, are there plans to add a setting for this? Are people saying it's just a web proxy because it doesn't currently handle DNS?

    Just wondering.

  • Are people saying it's just a web proxy because it doesn't currently handle DNS?

    Opera VPN is what some may call a 'Browser"VPN, it works only inside the browser for data traveling through the browser.

    It's basically a proxy.

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