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Greetings Programs! I'm from Opera 12.64. Is it even worthwhile to drop by to say hello?

  • Statistics are an interesting thing. You can make them say pretty much whatever you choose. The truth is, we don't know what most Opera users are doing. If you were to count all of the negative posts in the various threads posted on this forum it would only amount to a few thousand and even that is deceiving since many of those are repeats by the same posters. Opera users worldwide number in the millions and the truth is, we don't know what they are using or thinking. It's simply too early to make predictions.

  • I'm still using 12.16 like many users.
    Considering all which has been said, Opera has fallen (which is dreadfully sad). I can't even recommend it to people anymore.
    The decision-makers (new ones?) at Opera Software clearly made a terrible and absurd mistake.

  • "I can't even recommend it to people anymore."

    Yeah, feeling that same 😞

  • My main reason for abandoning firefox all those years ago, was that you needed too many extensions to have what I considered to be basic features. And because each extension is developed independently, when combined with the browsers core functions, they tended to hog too much RAM and processor power.

    I don't want to go back to that.

    Not for something as basic as being able to delete a specific site's cookies, or setting up a proxy server in opera alone. Or extend the amount of time before a page times out.

    I feel like I've gone from an SLR to a point-and-shoot camera.

  • Funny thing about todays point and shoot cameras. They seem to do the job very well, they're far more popular and they're portable.

  • It depends on the job you want done. . . and what you consider to be "well".

  • Indeed. Most folks today are perfectly content with mirrorless cameras. My feeling is that Opera has awakened to that simple fact.

  • Indeed. Most folks today are perfectly content with mirrorless cameras. My feeling is that Opera has awakened to that simple fact.

  • Originally posted by leushino:

    Indeed. Most folks today are perfectly content with mirrorless cameras. My feeling is that Opera has awakened to that simple fact.

    So why buy brand A compared with brand B? Especially if the price is the same... or even free? It's the marketing and the product distinctives that work together to cause people to choose one over the other in such cases. So, a question can be raised: if rich configurability and unique/meaningful features are neither included nor marketed, why else would anyone prefer the product? As it applies to Opera, are the implementation elements of Blink Opera unique enough in the marketplace to create a demand for it, and are those elements being identified and persistently marketed to potential users - and, moreover, are they truly compelling enough for those users to go to the bother of installing and trying the product over some other brand?

    Mirrorless cameras may be all well and good, but a camera maker had better have a bunch of other unique and well-advertised features to differentiate himself in the marketplace from all the other mirrorless cameras, or else he'll be marginalized. Sadly, I've yet to see either the compelling features or the marketing of same by Opera. Sad, because if Opera fails in this, having already alienated much of its geek/power-user base, it will essentially have nowhere to go in the desktop browser arena.

  • Look, he raised the comparison to cameras not I. I simply accommodated him in his imperfect analogy. Opera is not going to reverse its direction. It's too late now. We've heard these same sob stories for months now with the result that... the new browser continues to be developed and the old becomes increasingly incompatible. If you don't like it - tough. That's life so deal with it.

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