Please, add the option to disable Opera autoupdate

  • Most softwares ask, during install, if autoupdate should be on or off.
    Opera should do the same.
    Worst, this option simply doesn't exist, forcing users to disable it "by force"...

  • I suppose disabling auto update may not hurt if your Opera is running fine and
    you don't mind missing new improvements or bug fixes. On the other hand, I have
    a serious problem with the Mail program hanging up at irritating times and they
    either don't know about it or haven't found a fix yet. I had it on both Win XP and
    Win 7 which I am now running. If I minimize the program and come back to it after
    half or an hour it seems to resolve itself, but that is not the mark of good
    programming. Auto trouble reporting may not work either so I am still waiting.

  • rclund, I mind about improvements and bug fixes, but mind a lot more about having control over what's running on my computer. I prefer to choose when to check for updates, so I disabled it using CCleaner, and, just to be sure, renamed the .exe 🙂
    I don't use the Mail program, but your comment reinforces my opinion that there's a LOT to do to make this new Opera stand to the reputation earned by it's predecessor.

  • In my experience, keeping a stable, configuration-controlled system ranks above keeping my software "fully updated". With over 525 application and utility programs (not even including drivers, etc) on my primary system, even if they each auto-updated only once a year, there would be an auto-update somewhere on the system every 16 hours, on average. If only one in 50 of those updates caused system instability, that would be between 10 and 11 update hiccups per year, occurring spontaneously out-of-the-blue... and usually without any evident hint which update(s) may have occurred to trigger them.

    I have far better things to do with my time than constantly chase down and decipher the consequences of such needless hiccups after-the-fact, in frantic efforts to try to either reverse the damage or figure out remedial measures. Anyone who has been bitten by Windows or antivirus program updates gone awry will know exactly what I mean. Far better to maintain the system in stable configuration and selectively apply updates manually as/if truly needed, and only after consulting the experiences and opinions of "early adopters" online. Consequently, auto-updating software will NOT have a place on my systems, unless they contain the means of reliably blocking such updates until such time as/if I elect to apply them.

  • I've no problem with auto-updating. In the 20+ years of using computers, I've yet to have an update adversely affect me. Guess I have the magic touch. 🙂

  • I've no problem with auto-updating. In the 20+ years of using computers, I've yet to have an update adversely affect me. Guess I have the magic touch.

    You must. In the past year, there have been over 15 problematic Windows updates alone (5 in just the July-Aug timeframe) that have given many users fits (blue screens, lock-ups, failure to boot, etc). I've avoided all of them simply by manually applying selected updates about 2-4 weeks after release, which gives me time to scan the online comments of the early adopters and dodge the bullets. Likewise for program updates for all manner of my apps software, including browsers. I learned my lessons the hard way after being badly burned multiple times back in the Win98-XP era... the good part being that it hammered home to me the importance of multiple forms of backups, frequently made.

  • leushino, you are realy an extremely lucky person 🙂
    blackbird71, I fully agree with you, and adopt the same attitude. Unfortunately some software designers don't...
    I periodically look for new processes in my system, and many are auto-updates. I only keep those that has the option to inform me first that an update exists, allowing me to check first if i want to install it.
    And never, never install it on the first day 🙂 Give it a week, and then check the Net for problems.

  • You must. In the past year, there have been over 15 problematic Windows updates alone (5 in just the July-Aug timeframe) that have given many users fits (blue screens, lock-ups, failure to boot, etc). I've avoided all of them simply by manually applying selected updates about 2-4 weeks after release, which gives me time to scan the online comments of the early adopters and dodge the bullets. Likewise for program updates for all manner of my apps software, including browsers. I learned my lessons the hard way after being badly burned multiple times back in the Win98-XP era... the good part being that it hammered home to me the importance of multiple forms of backups, frequently made.

    Nope. It may be that my Windows 8.1 update was later than those that proved problematic, but I was okay. No BSD for me. Now I will admit that what I do on the computer is relatively unimportant. I don't obsess over what is on my computer and I don't spend much time on it either... probably an hour at most per day. Now that I'm older I don't want to waste my life looking at some monitor. The world is too beautiful and I find myself outdoor enjoying it as much as possible. Besides... living along the ocean is too compelling to be wasting it on a computer. SO... I can appreciate that those whose livelihood depend on their computers might be a bit more concerned about having it freeze or lock up on them. it's just that I'm not one of them. Good luck to you both.

  • ...
    Nope. It may be that my Windows 8.1 update was later than those that proved problematic, but I was okay. No BSD for me. Now I will admit that what I do on the computer is relatively unimportant. I don't obsess over what is on my computer and I don't spend much time on it either... probably an hour at most per day. ... I can appreciate that those whose livelihood depend on their computers might be a bit more concerned about having it freeze or lock up on them. it's just that I'm not one of them. Good luck to you both.

    Well, some users running Win X-P/POS2009, 7, and 8.1 have all had various problems with 4 or 5 of the August MS updates (blue screens, etc) and the out-of-cycle update (2993651), just released recently to supposedly fix some of the August problems, has been itself now found to "brick" Windows Update functionality, among other things, for some users. Apparently, you're one of the fortunate users who've avoided all these fiascos. Unfortunately, those who have been hit have had no end of frustration in trying to fix things... "system restore" doesn't even fix some of the problems, and no two users seem to have the same results with any other given solution path.

    Even though Microsoft will eventually sort all this out, my main point is that there are many users who studiously try to lower their exposure to all this kind of auto-update grief. Computers and their software have become incredibly complex with all their myriad of digital interactions... so it becomes extremely hard for any software coder to take it all into account, even in their extensive "lab" testing. Those of us who value system stability above all else need the capability, within each piece of software, to be able to block the automatic updating whilst we monitor the experiences of other users acting as "canaries in the mine-shaft" (Bless 'em all!) We also try to organize our manual updating at times and usage patterns so that rogue updates don't crash our systems at inopportune times. Blink Opera doesn't provide the necessary update blocking ability currently, although by renaming the updater executable, one can obtain that effect. Far better would be the conventional technique (like in most other software) of giving these users an option to select auto, block and notify, or simply block auto-updating. As it currently stands, I simply cannot recommend Blink Opera to my similarly-oriented user friends without such a feature.

  • Win XP

    Rofl. It's dead by name :lol:

  • Uh... Windows is far from dead. It is used on 90% of all computers in China and in spite of the evil empire's desire to release their own OS, Windows will remain for the foreseeable future. Furthermore, MS would continue on for years on the revenue from its patents alone so it has no worries about income. Windows 9 is only a year away and the release of the early preview should be in a few weeks. I'm very excited about what Threshold has to offer. I understand the hatred of MS by many, particularly in the Opera community, but that hardly constitutes a threat to the company. But... we're losing focus here. The thread is about auto-updates. To each his own, I guess. I've no issues with Opera continuing to auto-update on my system but for those who want more control for a variety of reasons... more power to you.

  • Uh... Windows is far from dead. ...

    Actually, I think @christoph142 may have meant that when you enter "Win X-P" without the hyphen in a message, it will render in this forum as "Win", followed by a 'dead' smilie, eg: Win XP. Obviously, there are some coders with entirely too much time on their hands...

    In reality, the Win X-P Point-of-Sale version of the OS will be supported/updated by Microsoft for some time yet, so a number of X-P users have modified their installations into the X-P POS version. I will make no comment about alternate interpretations of "POS"... 😉

    Edited to add: By the way, two more auto-updates for MS Win 8.1 can now be added to the list of problem creators... 8.1 does not ship with Netframework 3.5, but auto-updating adds patches for that nevertheless - which bricks a user's subsequent ability to install NF 3.5 if they need it for some reason. Before this is all over, there are going to be a fair number of Windows users who regret leaving auto-updating turned on...

  • You can input "XP" within these - <nobbc>``</nobbc>: "XP".

    Though I agree the smilie's code had better be changed. Like "xxP" or something.

  • Actually, I think @christoph142 may have meant that when you enter "Win X-P" without the hyphen in a message, it will render in this forum as "Win", followed by a 'dead' smilie

    At least one of you got me :cheers:

  • Sorry for the misunderstanding. Yesterday seems to have been a bad day for my ability to understand people. :faint:

  • I've no problem with auto-updating. In the 20+ years of using computers, I've yet to have an update adversely affect me. Guess I have the magic touch.

    Apparently you didn't use the awesome mouse gestures of old that have been nearly completely eradicated.

  • I've no problem with auto-updating. In the 20+ years of using computers, I've yet to have an update adversely affect me. Guess I have the magic touch.

    Apparently you didn't use the awesome mouse gestures of old that have been nearly completely eradicated.

    Those two things are not related in any way. Opera 11/12 were never and still aren't auto-upgraded to newer versions.

  • I myself have no real problem with an auto update i would just like an option to turn it off or at least tell me tell me when its doing it

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