Mac Pro vs. Mac Mini

  • I want to say once more:

    Opera Next is like a Mac Mini, and Opera Classic is like a Mac Pro.

    These are two different products. You wouldn't want to do the same things with them.

    This means several things:

    • do not ask the devs to add Classic features to Next
    • the continued version numbering system is a lie
    • there is not just one Opera browser, and you shouldn't be using "Opera" or "Opera browser" as a word to identify Opera Next
    • two distinct products each deserve their own development trajectory
    • Opera browser was never an exponent of its rendering engine: people used Opera for its functionality, not its underlying engine; therefore the distinction between Classic and Next is also not fundamentally about the rendering engine
    • it would be perfectly possible or at least imaginable to revamp Opera Classic with the new engine, and I expect this to happen at some point
    • it makes perfect sense to focus on developing a new product exclusively before you let your attention go back to the old product. Then, you can use the new perspective to decide what you want to do with the old. I expect this to take another couple of years, at least.
    • it is really not feasible for any company to overhaul two related products like this at the same time. Main point being that it is unclear what you want to do with the old product, if anything at all, until you have growing experience with the new.
    • Opera Software is creating a public perception nightmare by treating Next as a continuation of Classic
    • all of the "WHERE ARE MY BOOKMARKS" topics are the direct result of this "gender confusion"
    • I believe it would serve Opera Software to become clear about this and to communicate clearly; currently you are trying to lie to people about what Opera is and was. Opera Classic is hidden away somewhere in a dark corner of the website. Opera Next is presented as the only player in town, the only product on the market, the only thing that exists.
    • it seems to be the cool thing to do, to provide a horrible user experience on websites that sell your product. Just check out Dropbox or, even worse, Medium. Medium has the worst user interface I ever encountered anywhere, even after you log in, and they seem to think it is the new cool. It is the equivalent of saying: "I am not going to give you any information at all. Therefore, you will just need to click this shiny big button and all will be well. Seriously, you can trust us. Everyone trusts us. Just click the shiny big button. Come on, just do it. Everyone else has done so as well. You don't want to be left behind, do you?"
    • the Opera browser used to be the complete opposite, the total contradiction of this lame ass commercial product forcing-down-your-throat, which is why everyone is so pissed off
    • this commercialist style is the reason why I personally never read company product pages, I always go to Wikipedia if possible. Likewise, the current Opera website is an attempt to obfuscate and disinform the public. The basic premise is that people shouldn't know too much about what you are or they'll be turned away, so you just provide them with as little info as possible. As a result, it is totally not possible to know "what the fvck has happened to Opera?" just by reading (err.... looking at) the web page that you are presented with.
    • all of this ties together into a mess of horror and means you, Opera Software, are going to have a real hard time.

    Anyway, I just thought I'd make the post of all posts :P. And contrary to what Opera Software may want me to believe, there are still two products, and I use both of them.

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