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Fast Forward Feature

  • By programing an extension from scratch the incorporates that feature. Just so you know, its not a trivial thing to do. Thats why it didn't always work in Presto Opera and very few (none?) other browsers have it.

  • It worked extrememly well in Opera 12.17. So why the problem? I would pay money to have a browser have that feature. Hear that, MONEY. ... and I did not forget the k.

  • For what reasons they should restore this unpopular feature? 99% of a mainstream browsers (IE, Crome, stock FF)users never had an idea about it. For comfort feature set use old Opera or Firefox with extensions (there is FastForward extension, AFAIR).

  • Money huh? How much does a programmer make per hour? Now how many hours would it take a programmer to write that feature to work with the new rendering engine? Multiply the first by the second and thats how much money you'll need to pay. Honestly I don't see it happening anytime soon. Theres far more people complaining about how the sidebar, keyboard shortcuts, an email client, and stupid Bing as a default search engine are more important that this and those aren't even things that the Dev team has said are that important.

  • Where is the code for the fast forward feature in the old opera? How would I develope my own button in the new Opera?

  • To my knowledge the code for Opera 12 was never released to the public. It was most likely written in some form of C or C++ though. Extensions for the current Opera are written using scripting languages. Specifically HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Luckily they are much easier to learn than C is. The Opera team have also made a basic startup guide to written your own extensions, which I will link at the bottom of the page. Opera uses the same system as Chrome for extensions so a guide written for them would also help you make extensions for Opera.

    https://dev.opera.com/extensions/tut_basics.html

  • Is there a way for me to see the code for the fast forward feature? Can you put me through to the developer?

  • Extensions are ZIP archives. Unpack them and inspect the source.

    Or start Opera Developer Tools and select in Sources the extension code.

  • atng on jan 16 says that the fast forward feature is not popular. Thats is a dumb answer. When you have a web site that lists mutiple images, like jpegs, it is much easier to open one image and fast forward to the next, rather than closing the window/tab and opening the next image and so forth. Fast forward is a good feature. Its jsut that the developers went ahead and did their own thing without any consideration to the OPera 12.17 feature popularity. Selfish nerdheads.

  • Useful and popular are not the same word. Anyway, you are free to re-add the feature to the browser yourself. We eagerly await your creation of an extension that will add this feature to the new version of Opera.

  • @tgarden
    You probably don't understand the conception of Opera/Blink.
    An average users of Chrome, IE and Firefox who have never heard about FastForword feature, simply never used it. A non-experienced and not exacting users now the main target audience for Chropera. The most of a mainstream users simply don't care about features (that are too "geeky", advanced and non-standard) in their web-browsers .
    For what reasons Opera should implement an extremely low popular features such FF, FTW, bookmarks manager, customizable UI and controllability etc.? It costs a lot of man-hours and money. To satisfy a marginal part of users?

  • What is Opera/Blink and Chrapera?

  • Blink is the rendering engine used in the current version of Opera, its based on Chrome technology. Presto was the old rendering engine from 12.17 and earlier. Chropera is a disparaging term some users name the current Opera because they think it is too much like Chrome and don't like it.

  • Chropera is a disparaging term some users name the current Opera because they think it is too much like Chrome and don't like it.

    Not at all. This term is just to distinguish these two enterily different(technologically, conceptually, ideologically..) web-browsers.

  • from feb 23:
    For what reasons Opera should implement an extremely low popular features such FF, FTW, bookmarks manager, customizable UI and controllability etc.?

    So why was it introduced in 12.17 and earlier?

  • How can I get a fast forward plugin for Opera? What other names does fast forward go by?

  • Try googling FastForward Extension and see what you can find... either for Opera or Chrome. Sometimes you'll see Fast Forward terminology coupled with Rewind.

  • So why was it introduced in 12.17 and earlier?

    Because Opera was targeting power users at the time. They are no longer their primary target so very geeky and little used features have been put on the back burner during the rebuild process.

  • I don't understand how this feature could not be useful. For example, in the following site:

    http://www.sil.si.edu/imagegalaxy/imageGalaxy_collResult.cfm?term=Butterflies and Moths

    there are a series of images in a row. With the fast forward feature you can move from to the next one in one click. Otherwise you would have to close the open view and then select the next view. Very useful.

  • I don't understand how this feature could not be useful. ... With the fast forward feature you can move from to the next one in one click. ... Very useful.

    I don't think its basic usefulness is in dispute, only whether it's sufficiently 'useful' to enough users to make its code design and continuing support through future redesigns worth the effort, in the sole opinion of the browser developers. There are a variety of browser features that are extremely useful to certain folks in certain browsing patterns, but aren't included into a given browser design because the developers believe the effort is not worth the overall reward in terms of which users they're attempting to focus their design upon. Including any feature into a browser requires coding and debugging, especially considering the possible negative interactions with other features, present and future. Plus it usually adds to the 'weight' of the browser: its code size, RAM requirements, and operating speed.

    At the end of the day, a user has several paths to choose from: politely point out a feature's need to the developers (which you and some others have done) and accept their decision, use a browser extension or plug-in that adds the feature, or choose another browser that includes the feature.

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