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Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?

  • Even f I force more raster threads and force HW rasterization on all layers, Youtube still runs like absolute garbage in Opera. 1080p60 is unplayable and lags so badly video just stops playing. f I try the same in Edge, video plays smoothly at 1080p60. But I don't want to use Edge because its useless garbage for everything else but video playback which is smooth for some reason.

  • You said Edge works fine, but have you checked Chrome, Chromium and Vivaldi (while taking note of the Chromium version they're using) to see how they behave? Did you try Developer/Snapshot versions of Opera, Vivaldi, Chrome and Chromium?

    Did you try a few older builds of Opera to see if you can find out when the issue started?

    The problem might be due to a change in Chromium instead of Opera. Or, it might be a certain version of Opera where it started. It might work fine in Chrome (Chrome uses all of FFMPEG while Opera uses Windows APIs for proprietary codecs), but not in other Chromium browsers.

    Anything special about your monitor and DPI settings? High refresh rate? High DPI? Does messing with those (as a test) show improvement?

    Can you find some 1080p@60 mp4 files, download them and play them locally in Opera? Try same thing with webm. Do they play fine?

    Your GPU should be able to decode all kinds of codecs in hardware.

  • @rejzor

    Have you tested on a clean profile?

  • @burnout426 said in Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?:

    You said Edge works fine, but have you checked Chrome, Chromium and Vivaldi (while taking note of the Chromium version they're using) to see how they behave? Did you try Developer/Snapshot versions of Opera, Vivaldi, Chrome and Chromium?

    Did you try a few older builds of Opera to see if you can find out when the issue started?

    The problem might be due to a change in Chromium instead of Opera. Or, it might be a certain version of Opera where it started. It might work fine in Chrome (Chrome uses all of FFMPEG while Opera uses Windows APIs for proprietary codecs), but not in other Chromium browsers.

    Anything special about your monitor and DPI settings? High refresh rate? High DPI? Does messing with those (as a test) show improvement?

    Can you find some 1080p@60 mp4 files, download them and play them locally in Opera? Try same thing with webm. Do they play fine?

    Your GPU should be able to decode all kinds of codecs in hardware.

    Everything but Edge runs like absolute garbage. Opera, Firefox, Vivaldi, you name it. Not even override software blocklist does anything compared to how it helped on AMD E-450. It's crazy and absurd.

    @zalex108 said in Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?:

    @rejzor

    Have you tested on a clean profile?

    I have and t makes zero difference,

  • @rejzor said in Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?:

    Everything but Edge runs like absolute garbage. Opera, Firefox, Vivaldi, you name it. Not even override software blocklist does anything compared to how it helped on AMD E-450. It's crazy and absurd.

    You might have better luck filing this for Chrome/Chromium. If it's something they can fix, Opera should inherit the fix.

  • How can I try older Opera version? I tried FileHippo and it just offered me a stub downloader instead of actual old version...

  • @rejzor said in Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?:

    How can I try older Opera version? I tried FileHippo and it just offered me a stub downloader instead of actual old version...

    Look here for the version you want: https://ftp.opera.com/pub/opera/desktop/
    I always recommend using Opera's own FTP site for old versions... it's a safer way to go, since Opera never bundles anything else with its downloads.

    However, I do suggest you perform the following steps: download the version you want from Opera's FTP site, disconnect the computer from the Internet, uninstall your present Opera (using the option to keep your personal data), then install the version of Opera you've downloaded. Next, locate the "opera_autoupdate.exe file" (it should be located in the Program Files/Opera/**.*.****.** subfolder associated with the version number you've just installed) and rename that autoupdater file to something different (eg: opera_autoupdateORIG.exe). Then and only then reconnect the computer to the Internet. Otherwise, the autoupdater will update your installation to the latest version as soon as you finish installing the downloaded one.

    Do keep in mind, however, that until/unless you rename the autoupdater file back to its original name, your system will not automatically keep Opera current (unless you manually update it at some point).

  • I think I found a culprit. I know it was all fine when I bought it so I downgraded OS to old version and everything was smoother, even desktop itself. Windows 1709 straight from ISO was fine. But after installing one of updates for it and it turned my AMD A9-9420 APU laptop into absolute trash. I knew something was off, but it was most noticeable in Opera where it felt like I'm back in 1999 using god damn Celeron 333. I need to figure out which update exactly totally screws up performance. I don't get it, am I the ONLY user that experienced this from entire freaking world? Seems weird...

  • @rejzor said in Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?:

    I think I found a culprit. ... I need to figure out which update exactly totally screws up performance. I don't get it, am I the ONLY user that experienced this from entire freaking world? Seems weird...

    Unfortunately, you're not the only one experiencing system issues from Windows updates. Since Microsoft reduced their Quality Assurance staff several years ago and instead started using telemetry feedback from Windows Home and Pro users in the field for their debugging, problematic Windows updates on certain systems have become the order of the day. Even more problematic are driver updates being also pushed by Microsoft to users' systems.

  • @blackbird71 And how is telemetry going to tell them that my entire laptop runs like crap? It's not crashing, not having lockups, errors or freezes, it's just horrendously slow for no logical reason. I don't even know who to contact at Microsoft to get it fixed...

  • My suggestion is downgrade to W8.1, it's the best Windows OS ever. 10 is pure crapware

  • @rejzor said in Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?:

    @blackbird71 And how is telemetry going to tell them that my entire laptop runs like crap? It's not crashing, not having lockups, errors or freezes, it's just horrendously slow for no logical reason. I don't even know who to contact at Microsoft to get it fixed...

    The Windows telemetry runs in the background, more or less in bursts all the time; moreover, it uses multiple IP addresses that you will find very difficult to block via a firewall, hosts file, etc. Depending on certain settings options, various kinds and details of data are phoned home. As to many of the specific details, Microsoft has been less than forthcoming. This, in turn, has been the source of many privacy questions and criticisms from users ever since Win10 first emerged.

    Moreover, regarding telemetry, Microsoft couldn't care less about your particular system... they're collating data from millions of users looking for various pattern failures that they can then fix before they ship the updates to their more lucrative (and stability-demanding) Enterprise users. Home and Pro users may be able to delay the forced updates for varying amounts of time, but they can't pick and choose among them nearly as easily as in previous Windows versions - hence they can't avoid the early-adopters' problematic ones as easily as in the past. It's more than likely Microsoft's telemetry indeed has data indicating the slowdown on your system after whichever update was involved, but that merely represents a single occurrence to Microsoft. Only if they see enough similar field problems will anything be done to fix/re-build the update for later users, none of which will do your system any good unless the problem is sufficiently widespread.

    Microsoft's object in doing this is to use the "free" field testing by users as a substitute for more costly in-house QA testing... but that goal does not include helping a specific user fix a problem caused by one of their updates. Since the 1709 "Fall Update" first emerged last autumn, there have been literally multiple dozens of updates issued (clustered in groups), of which perhaps 10-20 have caused multiple users a wide variety of issues. One of the most common causes have been update conflicts with various hardware drivers on certain systems.

    I wish things were otherwise, but sadly they're not. Unless a user is something of a Windows guru, about all they can do is to install the basic Win10 OS and block the Windows update service from functioning. Then the user manually downloads each Win10 update one-at-a-time and checks operation after each to try to find the problematic update. If he finds one, he can "hide" it from the auto-updater's view (for a time period not clearly defined by Microsoft) if he wants to resume allowing the Windows updater to function. It's messy and labor-intensive; but for some users, it's about all they can do unless they know somebody who is skilled and experienced in Windows update problems.

  • @blackbird71 said in Terrible performance, how to figure out what's causing it?:

    The Windows telemetry runs in the background, more or less in bursts all the time; moreover, it uses multiple IP addresses that you will find very difficult to block via a firewall, hosts file, etc.

    For the curious,
    Fiddler to watch Windows Telemetry in action!!

    xDDDD

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