I want the old Opera Presto back....

  • well i know that opera has become a chromium based browser. every new browser is going to chromium these days. i liked Opera browser because it was different. it was not like Chrome not like Firefox and not like Internet Explorer. it was customizable and with lots of features like Opera note, option to just show cached images or dont show any images, use your own customizable css etc.
    and now it all looks the same only interface is changed. i mean whats the difference. everything behind the interface is chromium based.
    if i have to used chromium than i will used Google Chrome. not Opera, not Vivaldi, not Yandex not anyone.

    i just want to say that continue updating the Opera Presto version. than you will have two types of browser. than everyone will be happy.

  • Updating the old Presto version was already too much work to keep it competitive. Now you want them to update 2 browsers at once? Considering that almost all of Opera revenue comes from their add network these days and their web browser business is much less important I very much doubt that will happen. Also, many of the devs that were in the Presto camp have already left the company. Specifically gone over to Vivaldi. So its not gonna happen.

  • Most people are happy with the new Opera browser, but there will always be someone that refuse to test new products. You may well be able to use Opera presto for many years still, but upgrades will be more rare.

    It is of no use that people starts new threads every day with "I want old Opera presto back....". This subject is dead and buried forever.

    Eighter you can use old Opera presto as long as it works or give a new browser a chance.

    Finito.

  • You say you will use Chrome but not any of the other Chromium based browsers?? Clearly you don't have a problem with the chrome rendering engine. I don't get why you care so much about the Presto engine when all you talk about are the features you miss. Features have nothing to do with a rendering engine. You should look at Vivaldi as it is the browser trying to bring back the customisability of the old Opera.

  • The poster is saying that there are many browsers that can render web pages, and if that's all he wanted to do new opera and all the others would be fine. But currently there is no browser that is a good enough substitute for presto

    And by the way don't forget opera in not being supported by any more companies than before, far as I can tell

  • I'm personally happy to where the new Opera is heading.. Opera Presto had hard time to keep up and the new one is heavy enough without any additions. You can try other browsers like Vivaldi to see for yourself.

  • ... i liked Opera browser because it was different. ...
    i just want to say that continue updating the Opera Presto version. than you will have two types of browser. than everyone will be happy.

    There were a number of things I liked about the 1953 Chevy - and still do. But there's no way I'd ever expect or ask GM to start selling updated '53s, particularly if they had to give them away free. So I have to be content with either using an old car or choose among the new car designs and brands. The reality is that both GM and Opera have moved on; what they both did in the past now belongs to nostalgia.

  • ... i liked Opera browser because it was different. ...
    i just want to say that continue updating the Opera Presto version. than you will have two types of browser. than everyone will be happy.

    There were a number of things I liked about the 1953 Chevy - and still do. But there's no way I'd ever expect or ask GM to start selling updated '53s, particularly if they had to give them away free. So I have to be content with either using an old car or choose among the new car designs and brands. The reality is that both GM and Opera have moved on; what they both did in the past now belongs to nostalgia.

    They are not building cars that don't have features that the previous versions had. Except for cigarette lighters and it is still an option for most cars

  • As an example, I have tried the zoom slider attempts in vivaldi, otter and an extension for new opera. None of them worked as well as the one in old opera. I just shook my head and went back to opera 12.

  • Last I checked you can't buy a car with a cassette player anymore. Or a car (not truck or van) with front bench seats either. When was the last time you saw a new (non-turd tier) car missing a hubcap? What about two-tone paint from the factory? Vinyl roof? Curb feelers? Overdrive? Heck, some companies are phasing out manual transmissions too. Some cars aren't being built with them as options at all whiles others are 'losing' them. Take the 2016 Toyota Tacoma for example. You want a manual you are stuck with the I-4 engine. Its not available on the V6 anymore. Can't get a standard anymore cab either. Not enough people buy them. See, the thing is, when you have so few people using a feature that its not cost effective to keep maintaining it then it tends to get dropped. Or if something better comes along to replace it of course.

    Who needs an email application built into their web browser anymore? Your either already using a web based email application or your have Exchange, which has a web interface. Ad-blocker? Extensions that do that are worlds better than Opera 12's basic one. Same deal with sessions (thank you Session Buddy). Built in IRC client? Ask ten people to tell you want that is and you'll get nine confused looks and one person saying 'Oh yeah, I remember that.' Most people don't use customizable interfaces. When Firefox drops the feature there will be no web browsers with any significant market share left that offers that feature. With good reason. Its hard to maintain and gets little use.

    This is the direction things are going, not because of you, but because of everyone else. People complain that Opera lost so much but they forget that Opera offered that features for YEARS and no one cared. They were suck in the single digit market share for decades. If people wanted that stuff they would have voted with their feet. Heck, for most people Internet Explorer is more than they will ever need. Used be surprised how many people don't even use or know what the address bar is. As long as their start page has a search engine (even a garbage one like Yahoo or Ask) they don't know the difference. BOOKMARKS are a feature thats only used by like 45% of users. Think about that.

  • i think most can agree that new opera while is up to date, security and all this stuff it is not better than old opera. Fact is whenever I have to use another browser I don't even bother with new Opera just because it says opera. I just go to the most popular browser, chrome.

    as for cars not having cassette tapes, they didn't take away a music player, they replace it with something and easier to use. No more tapes getting chewed up in the machine.

    Anyway to each his own, we have a choice between old and new for now

  • you know what Opera mini that is a mobile browser still uses the Presto rendering engine. and it is the most popular browser in the mobiles. and there is also a Opera Browser but Opera mini is more popular. and why is that because you know why...
    if they can manage to develop two types of browser in mobile apps market than they can also manage to develop two kind of browser for PC.

    i am really worried about if Mozilla Firefox will drop gecko and start using the chromium rendering engine in the coming future. and they will also say that "chromium rendering engine is better" that's why we dropped gecko.

  • You're not really listening to what Blackbird and lando said so eloquently. While Presto Opera had many unique features, the FACT is that most people couldn't have cared less. That is one of the reasons Opera never gained a better user base than 2% worldwide. Vivaldi and Otter are attempts to appeal to an exceedingly small, so-called power-user group but the truth is the vast majority of users will never bother with either of these browsers and ultimately they will fail for financial reasons. Opera is under no obligation whatsoever to continue to develop the older Presto browser. Deal with it. Move on. As I see it, you have a few viable choices: use one of the modern, UPDATED, secure browsers (i.e. Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Edge) OR continue to use the discontinued Presto browser with no hope whatsoever that it will ever be updated. The engineers that developed it are largely GONE. The reasons for discontinuing it have been stated a multitude of times. Suffice it to say, it was not financially prudent to continue maintaining it - end of story. There are people still using Windows 98 SE and Windows XP because they refuse to upgrade. Neither OS is supported by MS and both are increasingly insecure to use online. But some continue to use them anyway. You're going to experience the exact same things with the older Opera browser as more and more websites refuse to load and security becomes an issue. Do you realize how few people really care about the older Opera browser? Among my family members, colleagues and friends, not a single one uses Opera and my guess is that only a handful of them even know of its existence and even among them there is no interest in Opera whatsoever. Really... you need to deal with facts and stop living in a fantasy world. Opera Presto is dead to all intents and purposes. Use it at your own risk but recognize that it will only continue to degrade over time. Better to move to the modern Opera browser and learn how to make it behave as closely as you can to what you formerly had.

  • Heck, Comodo maintains two browsers with two different rendering engines! Why not OP? If OP reestablished Presto, I'd be back in a moment! Sadly, dropping PRESTO, which was wonderfully secure, fast and stable, was a stupid decision!

    G.C. Griswold

  • wonderfully secure, fast and stable, was a stupid decision!

    It was not secure, which was part of the problem. It was also rapidly becoming obsolete as the team was having difficulty maintaining the massively complex interface and keep it up to date with web standards. Switching to the Chromium renderer solved the latter problem. Unfortunately the older interface was not compatible with anything but the Presto renderer and couldn't be easily adapted, so it was left behind as well.

    I'd be back in a moment!

    How much would you pay for it though? They were already having problems maintaining it and trying to do both would probably require 2.5 times the people they have now. The web browser is a very small part of Opera's overall business and its income is very small as it is. If you were going to double (and then some) the price of labor on the thing there is no way it could pay for itself.

  • ...Comodo maintains two browsers with two different rendering engines! Why not OP? If OP reestablished Presto, I'd be back in a moment! ...

    Comodo operates from a different business model than does Opera ASA, hence it will balance its development tradeoffs differently. The simple reality is that all web browsers currently are free of charge to the user. How that plays out in a particular business and where that business derives its net income (as it certainly must in order to survive) depends upon its overall product mix and cost structures, as well as upon the expectations of the owners to whom the business is accountable - and no two businesses will go down the same path. Like it or not, Opera ASA has moved on; Presto increasingly belongs to history. Your only choice going forward is what browser you will use in the present and the future.

  • Well, thank you for all of your responses. My choice is obvious: I'll use Pale Moon (64-bit version) as my default browser.

  • if i have to used chromium than i will used Google Chrome. not Opera, not Vivaldi, not Yandex not anyone.

    And yet you contradict this statement by using Pale Moon which is using Firefox's engine in Gecko, why not use Firefox instead?

    Heck, Comodo maintains two browsers with two different rendering engines! Why not OP?

    Because it requires Comodo little effort to maintain those two engines since they are open source being constantly maintained by two different groups. Presto on the other hand is a closed source engine that was maintained solely by Opera which was falling behind before they dropped it and would take very large effort to get back up to scratch.

    What you don't seem to understand though is all those features you say you miss from the Presto-based Opera weren't actually a part of the Presto engine itself but rather the browser front-end that uses it, and such features would just as easily work with a different rendering engine in place such as Blink or Gecko which is what the Blink-based Vivaldi aims to do. If they so desired Opera could implement those features into their current Blink-based browser, the question is whether any of the features are actually worth their time and effort, personally the only features I'm still really missing that I'd love to see back are its session management and tab placement options (loved having them down the left side).

  • ...
    What you don't seem to understand though is all those features you say you miss from the Presto-based Opera weren't actually a part of the Presto engine itself but rather the browser front-end that uses it, and such features would just as easily work with a different rendering engine in place such as Blink or Gecko which is what the Blink-based Vivaldi aims to do. If they so desired Opera could implement those features into their current Blink-based browser, the question is whether any of the features are actually worth their time and effort ...

    'Just as easily' is perhaps a major over-simplification of the effort involved. The ease of implementing a feature is dependent on the architecture and API's of the rendering engine, and those are by no means the same for Presto and Blink. Given the architectural process segmentation of Blink and its consequences, some Olde Opera features may be indeed very difficult to create in a chromish browser. That is the reason so many different chromish-based browser brands have similar-to-each-other appearance, "feel", and feature-gaps as compared with Olde Opera. Vivaldi is plowing new ground in attempting to harness CSS and such to create user feature-control of the rendering engine, but it's by no means 'easy' in many cases.

    Indeed, the question of which features are actually worth the effort to implement is a business-related decision involving the target user audience and which has to be made by the owners of the development operation. On that, Opera and Vivaldi have different views, and I'll defer to the future marketplace to determine which view will tend to prevail; given that the targeted users are not really the same, perhaps both will succeed in their own realms.

  • Wait. Is the right clicks in new opera editable. Right clicking an highlighted word or phrase only gives me a few standard options. What happened to dictionary, encyclopedia,etc. Or an extension can bring this back?

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