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They've ruined the bookmarks

  • Is it not possible to "manually" insert the old bookmark file into Opera 26?

    It totally possible. Open up your old Opera install on your old computer and use the export bookmarks feature to export them as an HTML file. Copy that file over to your new system and use Opera 26's import feature to import from a file. Browser to where you saved the HTML file and you are all set.

  • I have used Opera for years because of some features that made it different from other browsers, most importantly the bookmark feature that was "one-click"-accessible on the left side. With the current version it takes at least two clicks to get to the bookmarks, and then they cover the whole page.
    Now that Opera looks like any other browser on the market, there is really no reason to use it anymore. If I wanted another Google Chrome, I would use Google Chrome.
    It seems to me that Internet Explorer and Firefox are the only browsers that still offer "one-click"-accessibility for bookmarks, evrybody else does everything the can to drive users back to Microsoft and Mozilla.
    I will try to use Opera version 12 until it does not work anymore and then it's bye-bye Opera and hello Internet Explorer.

  • I've another bookmark question.

    Is there any way to create a subfolder within a bookmark folder? I sure as hell can't find a workaround.

    I have number of different subfolders that I want to include within one master folder but version 26 is only letting me create new folders at the higher level and not subfolders.

    An advice would be welcomed as this is fairly important to me.

  • What happen to the HOME icon? Do you have to go looking through the bookmarks to find what was HOME?

  • Drgwalker: If you use the bookmark bar you can create subdirectories ad infinitum. Simply create an empty primary bookmark with your desired name, then drag it to the existing bookmark. It will appear at the bottom of the list but you can drag it to the top. Subdirectories will not sort according to title, so they will stay where you put them.

    The Bookmarks Page is an unbelievable fudge-up. You can't drag anything anywhere. You can create new folders and add or remove them (click on My Folders) but I can see no way to create sub folders. Nor can I import bookmark bar folders. Personally, I wouldn't touch Opera bookmarks with a stick. The bar, imported from Chrome, works fine.

  • Thanks Bob - I spent an eternity today trying to fathom out a work around - simple when someone points out the solution.

    Like you say, the bookmark function is a complete farce. It's fairly critical to what I need from a browser - I like a couple things about Opera, but this version 26 looks like a complete bodge.

    I also use Firefox and their bookmark options are a piece of piss to work around.

    Thanks again!

  • You say Blink Opera is multi-process. Is that why when I open it loads of Opera processes appear in the Task Manager, the CPU usage shoots up and the PC gets slow?

    Yes, that's pretty much it, but on a modern multi-core computer with a decent amount of RAM there should not really be any significant slow down.

    Okay, I do have quite a few windows open, but my PC isn't that old. It's seven years old, but things haven't advanced that much in that time, it handles everything else fine, and... okay, I'm just going to say it... Opera 12 never had any problems with them. Which makes the new Opera a big step back, not a step forward, for me.

  • It's seven years old

    The number of transistors on a microchip doubles every 2 years. This has been the law of the land since about 1965. Your PC that is only 7 years old is about 1/12th as powerful as a current PC. By the end of this year it will be 1/16th as powerful. By 2017, at 10 years old, it will be 1/32nd as powerful as a computer that will have just hit the market. Computers are not like cars. They don't keep being fairly current and useful 5, 10, 15 years down the line. They are like newspapers. They are yesterdays news the minute they are sold and decline in usefulness rapidly from there. You can't expect a system of that vintage to be able to handle modern programs. Its like complaining that your Playstation 3 can't run Playstation 4 games.

  • ...
    Okay, I do have quite a few windows open, but my PC isn't that old. It's seven years old, but things haven't advanced that much in that time, it handles everything else fine, and... okay, I'm just going to say it... Opera 12 never had any problems with them. Which makes the new Opera a big step back, not a step forward, for me.

    I've been using computers since they had toggle-switches on the front to load binary code one word at a time. At every stage of usage since then, the hardest thing to accept has been how quickly a particular computer falls behind the current technology widely-employed in any given era. In that context, 3-4 years is becoming 'mature' for a computer. While I generally run a given system online out to 7-9 years, in every instance the last 2-3 years of such usage has been a real chore to keep the system current and to avoid it stalling-out. Standards change, hardware evolves, protocols change, memory demands grow, CPU cycles get consumed at ever-more staggering rates by the ordinary software (and sites) of the day. The sad reality is that a PC year is equivalent to 10 human years... so an average 7-year-old system is akin to an average 70-year old human: able to still do many things, but certainly no candidate for an Iron-man run.

    A modern web browser and modern graphics-rich, video-laden websites are heavy loads for an older computer. At that point, one has to think in terms of lightening the load when considering a browser (or any other demanding software).

  • I really doubt my computer is that bad. It runs everything without problem, it runs 3D games except the really demanding ones with all graphical enhancements switched on (and yes, I know a good part of that is due to the graphics card) and we are always being told that advancements in PC technology have stagnated due to the effects of the consoles. In short, except for a few games that are particularly high-spec, it works as well now as it did then.

    Telling someone that they have to buy a new computer in order to run their web browser properly is just ridiculous!

  • Has anyone here had any success using the bookmark search bar?

    I tryyyyyyyyy to type in a word - and blammo. If I'm not quick as a bunny, it takes the first two or three letters and off it goes, searching its idiotic heart out, bringing me nothing I want from my bookmarks. Stupidest thing I've ever seen.

    I can not type a full word in the search bar. Can anyone?

  • I really doubt my computer is that bad. It runs everything without problem ... In short, except for a few games that are particularly high-spec, it works as well now as it did then.
    Telling someone that they have to buy a new computer in order to run their web browser properly is just ridiculous!

    Please don't take such comments in an upside down way. Rather than having to buy a new computer in order to run a web browser properly (compared with a seven-year old computer), perhaps you need to consider adopting a web browser or employ browsing techniques whose demands are more properly suited to a typical seven-year old system. That's what I noted above as being something of a necessary chore in the 7 to 9 year-old phase of life of my own systems. Because greater memory capacity and CPU horsepower indeed are available on every emerging generation of systems, emerging browser designs (like most other new software) are intended to make use of them, some designs more than others. Thus some software designs at any given time will be much more demanding than others on a given system, and this shows up first and worst on older systems. It becomes up to the user of older systems to select software, settings, and usage patterns that allow or enable such software to run smoothly on their systems - or chose something else that will run to their satisfaction. Most software designers are focused on the current generation of hardware and its capabilities, and will not spend much time focused on limitations found mainly in older systems.

    Opera, Chrome, and other Webkit/Blink designs employ multiple-processes in their design, along with fairly hefty memory requirements. That taxes older systems in both the memory and CPU areas, and performance may suffer. Amongst even those browsers, different features and their implementations may further affect the loading of one compared with another. Regardless, if one is a many-tab user, the loading can become quite large, and performance become erratic or otherwise suffer on an older system. If one is a few or single-tab user, they may never notice issues on the same older system. The number of extensions demanded by the user also affects the loading, as does the content of the opened tabs. Only you can determine what software works best on your own system, what tweaks you need to make, and what limitations (if any) must or may result for your browser patterns.

  • I've been using Opera for more than the last 15 years. But it looks to me like someone is ruining the greatest browser on purpose. I know that's not true of course. But it looks like that 😞 And the new bookmarks system is one of the things which ruin the browser.

  • So use Opera 15. It had no bookmarks at all. You could also read some of the posts in this thread so you know whats actually happening and why things are the way they are.

  • I will try to use Opera version 12 until it does not work anymore and then it's bye-bye Opera and hello Internet Explorer.

    Microsoft is planning on retiring/replacing Internet Explorer and started building a new browser early last year code-named Spartan. The last Internet Explorer (11?) will be available on the Windows 10 previews, but once its time to finalize Windows 10, rumor has it there will only be Spartan. No more IE... YAY! LOL

  • I totally agree.
    New bookmarks are completely unmanageable.
    If you want to make some order in your folder you need to move each single bookmarks step by step. And you can't add a comment on the bookmark.
    Where the hell is gone the old easy to use side bar?
    The side bar was the thing which makes Opera different. Here you found bookmarks, all the links in the page, even take notes!!! This cr... thing is just another bad copy of chrome or explorer (I hate both).
    I use Opera since... it's long time I don't remember exactly, Opera has advertise or payment, but was centuries ahead. Opera created feature which are standard now.
    I even could pay to have the feature I want.
    I have a suggestion. Opera like it is for free. Special features by payment. 2€ for the old sidebar working good.
    Think about it.
    You can really make money!
    My bookmarks are a lot and well organized by folder and sub-folders, so, please, do something about it for the new release. Now, I must to export bookmarks, import and manage they using iceweasel, export from icewasel, delete opera bookmarks and import bookmarks in Opera again. It works, but....

    Greetings from Italy.

    PS:
    Other things I miss are:

    • the "GO" button. What the hell have you guys against the "go" button?
    • The "open with $otherbrowser" in context menu
    • Identify as ... to mock website which don't recognize opera as browser
    • the customizable bar where you put the buttons in you favourite order. Even add a "go" button.
    • the status bar where you can activate/disactivate images or Opera turbo as you wish. I live in Italy where adsl sucks, if you are the lucky one having an adsl, and Opera, with this, saved my days when I still must use the 56k modem, while other people run with a 20Mb adsl (a couple km from me downtown, maybe is 3 km).
  • I'm glad they decided to bring back Bookmarks, but there is still a lot of work to be done.
    One thing I still miss A LOT is using the keyboard to open bookmarks.
    In version 12 (still my main browser) you could access the bookmark menu with <alt>-b en then use letter keys to go through the folder structure to select and open a bookmark.
    Which is VERY much faster than using a mouse...

    So for me that is one of the main reasons to keep using version 12

  • Which is VERY much faster than using a mouse...

    You can still do that. Hit alt to bring up the Opera menu, then b to highlight bookmarks. Enter or the right arrow key to open the folder. From there you can use the letters to open the bookmarks or the arrow keys to more to navigate around. At least it works in Opera 28. I don't have an install of 26 to test it as 28 is my day to day browser.

  • I was a long time user of Opera up to version 12. I used the superb bookmarking as a reference library with 2000+ bookmarks in multiple nested folders. When they borked the feature I moved to Firefox as you can make it do pretty much the same thing with a couple of add-ons then last year FF started to get a bit flaky with some sites and a bit slow which ain't so good when your life involves booking planes a couple of hours ahead. Misbehaving browsers I just don't need.
    So I moved to Chrome - rock solid browsing and kind of awkward bookmarking but it works kind of OK. I'm hoping someone will write a decent cloud shareable bookmark app so we can all use whatever browser we damn well want but it doesn't seem forthcoming and I keep checking back on Opera hoping they'll wake up sometime and listen to the actual users but that doesn't seem too likely either.

    One thing I am keeping an eye on though is Otter. They're promising to make an Opera 12 clone with a new engine and yes... a proper bookmarking panel. So maybe you guys might like to check this out:

    http://otter-browser.org/

    Cheers
    Jeff

  • Want to see Bookmarks done right?

    Take a look at Jon von Tetzchner's (we know who that is right?) Vivaldi browser (technical preview)

    Tetzchner has a 25 member team, half of them ex-opera employees, and they've put forth a better initial release of a Blink/Chromium browser than Opera ASA was able to manage with its 200+ developers.

    Oh yeah, Tetzchner's given us tabs that stack, and can be placed on the left/right/top/bottom. A panel. Notes. Built-in email to come.

    So all those Opera defenders about how coding is so hard, and just be patient - and how we only had to wait 18 months+ for any semblance of Bookmarks? Yeah I don't think so.

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