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General Chat

  • Readmitted to the hospital on the 5th, I was performed with biopsy Tuesday the 10th. Home again, awaiting for the results, to get re-re-admitted for the third time - they're going to scratch my bone in any case, good if no parts removing, yikes. The doctor says when doing the bio, it might not have been resembling the ^bad^ though; however it says in my release paper, the extension seems several centimeters so it might seem I'm up to some pain one way or another.
    He treated my arm very well, however; feeling o'k, much better now.

    I broke the arm in that very place just making an energetic move. A piece of shit of a neighbour from 2 floor had made our house a dove territory - I was upset and moved against one trying to flap IN the building.
    ER took me to the hospital, I waited, then a traumatologist somehow immobilised it with pink gypsum.
    Yep, it's cancer. So that I wouldn't be TOO happy with the pink...

    😕 , the Hong-Cola gist (I don't know the English word spelling anyway) said it's not malignant. However, he barely even looked at the papers and he acted veeeery peculiarly.
    (Things getting peculiarlier and peculiarlier. /Alice;)
    Well, got a pass or what do you call it: consultation with a trauma surgeon in a Moscow clinic. This next Monday.
    (I hate travelling -- except I'm in charge;)

  • The English word is oncologist, as in on-colo-gist. A key factor working for you is not having it be malignant... which means it's far less likely to spread throughout the body. Usually malignancy is determined by microscopic examination of the cancer cell shape and structure to determine the type of cancer (which is why they did the biopsy), so my guess is that the oncologist simply looked at the lab report and noted the non-malignancy. Had it been malignant, time usually becomes critically important to get surgery, chemo, and/or radiation started before the cancer cells spread. If it's non-malignant, things frequently move at a slower pace unless the cancer is in a vital organ that needs immediate attention.

  • Not that breaking bones is fun, but it generally doesn't kill you.

  • Breaking an already chewed bone?
    Breaking a bone when you've got other health issues?

    Black, are you saying there is a "good" cancer and a ^bad^ cancer??? 😕


    It's flashing!
    It's not a trauma surgeon, it's cancer surgeon now (oncologist).
    Well, isn't it funny? First attempt of our local onc to send me mother called and was told "we only do legs"; now I called, and a major guy told me they didn't do bones, "though come, I'll see you".
    (:

  • Proper English word would be tumor, which means an unusual growth. A tumor may or may not be cancer. But I think he was saying there is bad cancer and worse cancer, really.

  • Sorry for the delay in responding; I've been away for a couple of weeks. A number of my family and friends, as well as myself, have had fair experience dealing with both benign and true cancer growths at points in our lives.

    There are a number of terms for abnormal cell growths, sometimes not used very precisely. Such abnormal growths can involve a variety of characteristics, and if or when a growth satisfies enough commonly-recognized characteristic categories, it is technically termed 'cancer' or 'malignant'; if not, the growth is typically termed 'benign'. Many types of malignant cells have been medically recognized and can be identified quickly via microscopic or other analysis of a biopsy sample. If the malignant cells are capable of aggressively spreading into other tissue cell types and locations in the body, the growths are termed 'metastatic'. When a growth remains in place, is non-metastatic, and only very slowly enlarges over time, even certain cancer types are sometimes also termed 'benign'. Hence, in common usage, there can be a blurring of terminology. I've seen both usages of the word benign, so only your doctors can tell you accurately what they meant by what they told you since only they have studied the biopsy results.

    Most medical people will assert that any kind of abnormal cell growth, even a truly benign one, has a potential to evolve or alter into a true cancer eventually, some types far more readily than others. Since cell abnormalities are just that - abnormal - they indicate something has changed within a cell that is causing it and its offspring to be peculiar. It has long been medically observed that cells that are abnormal have a greater potential for increasing their types and kind of abnormalities once they start down the path of abnormality; and since cells have the ability to replicate themselves, certain benign abnormal growths could eventually evolve into invasive abnormalities - what we call cancer.

    Consequently, all abnormal growths always bear careful watching for indications of alteration in what they're doing or how they appear. In some cases, either because of their location, the associated pain, or the historical likelihood that their cell type will eventually evolve into true cancer, such benign growths have to be dealt with, though there is not normally any need for urgent action. In most cases where the diagnosis of the abnormal growth is already cancer, because of the risks of further abnormality resulting in the cells metastasizing throughout the body, true cancer should be dealt with quickly and aggressively.

  • Hi, dudes!
    Thank you, Black!
    I had to go to the hospital for the third time now: yuck leaking in quantities and t~39C when I was admitted, phlegmona. The new, third doctors sliced me and diced me, now I'm more than a week home, kinda good. The fracture had already started to heal, however pathology must have remained in the bone, they removed the gypsum on the first day, now I wear a soft fixture instead. Certain muscles have grown "jammed" though due to this prolonged immobilisation, so here I've a dilemma: 1) I should move and exercise the arm, 2) I should keep the arm in the fixture.
    Awaiting a pass to see some special doctor in that special clinic in Moscow again - kinda. Should check on it every day, or every other day - as the "welcoming" doctor here in the policlinic/ambulatory said I could have my dressings skipping a day cause the wounds are dry and have been for some couple of weeks.

    So well, nutshell I'm home, feeling better.

  • So, the year's number's digits changed.. Custom suggests to be Happy with that...

    Did you know that here in Russia, tradition does not celebrate St Nicolas. Russian Orthodox Church is to "blame", perhaps: they even have "their own" calendar -- stupid enough not to adopt the Gregorian but they're rather stuck with the Julian one - 13 days late. Their Christmas is on the 7th of January, do you believe? And they do not much consider St Nick here on that.
    So here, traditionally we mostly celebrate the New Year rather than Christmas, and we have some Grandpa Frost instead of Santa Claus. The man is originally pagan as I gather; the name spells like "Ded Moroz" - almost "Dead Morose";)
    Nobody knows if the man ever had children, but the tradition holds that he has a granddaughter, named Snegurochka (derivative of "snow").

  • @joshl said in General Chat:

    ...
    Did you know that here in Russia, tradition does not celebrate St Nicolas. Russian Orthodox Church is to "blame", perhaps: they even have "their own" calendar -- stupid enough not to adopt the Gregorian but they're rather stuck with the Julian one - 13 days late. Their Christmas is on the 7th of January, do you believe? And they do not much consider St Nick here on that.
    So here, traditionally we mostly celebrate the New Year rather than Christmas, and we have some Grandpa Frost instead of Santa Claus. The man is originally pagan as I gather; the name spells like "Ded Moroz" - almost "Dead Morose";)
    Nobody knows if the man ever had children, but the tradition holds that he has a granddaughter, named Snegurochka (derivative of "snow").

    In Hispanic culture, January 6 (El Dia De Los Reyes) is a major gift-giving time, since it's a traditional Christian feast day supposedly commemorating the gifts brought by the three Magi to the Christ child. On the other hand, there are some interpretations that argue that the birth of Christ actually occurred in the Spring near the Passover time, since the shepherds in Judea normally didn't pasture their flocks in the fields during the winter months, but instead took them out to pasture in the spring/summer season when pasturage was richer. The Bible seems silent on directly providing the date, and it appears December 25th may have been chosen by the Early Church to coincide more directly with the end of the Roman feast of Saturnalia which ended on Dec 23, and which involved banquets and gift-giving. Moreover, there were a number of pagan festivals worldwide around the winter solstice of 25 December on the Julian calendar. Or so the story goes...

  • Getting a surgery next week. My rear end maintenance :embarrassed:

  • Good morning!
    Someone woke me up maliciously:)
    How is it going today, folks?

  • Guys! Guess what?
    Bought a pack of toilet paper yesterday labelled "Emotion". No kidding.
    Will I express emotion when using it, you think? 🙂

  • @joshl Perhaps 'relief'.

  • After watching some "Third Watch" episodes, I had an intense dream this night.
    There was an Evil. And I appeared to be some kind of a Super Submarine Man: I supersonicked through the ocean, shot up out and feared I could be caught while such "fish-flying".
    Then I woke up. Next episode next week 😃

    If your dreams seemed interesting, would you share some?
    Be careful though. Dreams reflect our psyche, hidden desires, I think. Do you think?

    Well, in the morning I had another dream.
    A young woman I met in the city, we Ltrained back together. Maybe it was a destiny, I had her book to return... Then a dog turned into my mother.

  • @blackbird71 said in General Chat:

    There are a number of terms for abnormal cell growths, sometimes not used very precisely. Such abnormal growths can involve a variety of characteristics, and if or when a growth satisfies enough commonly-recognized characteristic categories, it is technically termed 'cancer' or 'malignant'; if not, the growth is typically termed 'benign'. Many types of malignant cells have been medically recognized and can be identified quickly via microscopic or other analysis of a biopsy sample. If the malignant cells are capable of aggressively spreading into other tissue cell types and locations in the body, the growths are termed 'metastatic'. When a growth remains in place, is non-metastatic, and only very slowly enlarges over time, even certain cancer types are sometimes also termed 'benign'. Hence, in common usage, there can be a blurring of terminology. I've seen both usages of the word benign, so only your doctors can tell you accurately what they meant by what they told you since only they have studied the biopsy results.

    After my biopsy, they were sending me to a clinic. I'm still not there - waiting list to the next millennium...
    Well, I read my CT report. It said I had some of my bone tissue changed, like structurally. The CT saw it that way, that's why they ordered the biopsy.

  • @joshl said in General Chat:

    ...
    After my biopsy, they were sending me to a clinic. I'm still not there - waiting list to the next millennium...
    Well, I read my CT report. It said I had some of my bone tissue changed, like structurally. The CT saw it that way, that's why they ordered the biopsy.

    In your earlier posts, you indicated that the biopsy reports/consults led to medical opinions that the abnormal cells weren't malignant, so the doctors probably don't feel the sense of urgency with whatever cell abnormalities were observed that they might have felt if they had seen a potentially life-threatening kind of malignancy. However, they probably feel a clinic exam and/or treatment path might be merited, nevertheless, if the cells showed benign abnormality that might have a potential to mutate to something more serious later on.

  • @joshl said in General Chat:

    Bought a pack of toilet paper yesterday labelled "Emotion". No kidding.
    Will I express emotion when using it, you think? 🙂

    I felt nothing. Just nothing.
    Maybe I'm emotionally bankrupt? 😕

  • In the morning, I had a dream I'm a surgeon student or intern evaluating a patient with heart and GI problems, then I appeared to be that patient and was subject to craniotomy. Earlier I dreamt being a nanny with a rich family, the little girl loved me:D

  • The last year was rather gross to me. A rich brother suing poor me for money, health problems...
    Now I hope it turns for the better. I even bought a skateboard recently - it just sits hanging on my wall, scary thing with TWO shaky wheels...
    Who knows how to learn to ride this deadly device?