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New Windows XP user - Questions

  • @jdlomonaco
    Opera 36 works fine on my system (I use Trend Micro Internet Security) but my machine is a powerful one. How much RAM does your system have, and what processor? It could indeed be just a problem with the hardware not being up to running a quite demanding program very quickly.
    I wouldn't worry about the auto updating, there is no danger of it updating to an incompatible version as the checking routine will detect that you are running XP. If you disable it there is a possibility that you might miss a future update for Opera 36, although I do think that it's unlikely that there will ever be another one now!
    🙂

  • Thanks for the reply. Yep it might be better to leave it alone in case there is a crash fix. I didn't think of that.

    The PC is a very old one with 1.5 G of RAM and a 1.7 Ghz Pentium processor. I keep it around to test some software that I wrote.

  • @jdlomonaco
    I'm pretty sure that's the cause of the poor performance.
    I imagine that Google Chrome wouldn't be any different.
    While I can understand Opera being slow on your system, it certainly shouldn't be actually crashing.
    🙂

  • Thanks for the reply. I had forgotten just how old that PC was until you asked about it. I had problems with Chrome and Fire Fox crashing. Opera isn't crashing. Its just so very slow that I get impatient waiting for "Speed Dial". On the other hand, I found that accessing a web page once they are Bookmarked is slow but OK.

  • @jdlomonaco
    Ah OK, when you said in your OP that Opera "sometimes requires a reboot to work at all" I assumed you meant it had crashed.
    🙂

  • @jdlomonaco said in New Windows XP user - Questions:

    Thanks for the reply. Yep it might be better to leave it alone in case there is a crash fix. I didn't think of that.

    The PC is a very old one with 1.5 G of RAM and a 1.7 Ghz Pentium processor. I keep it around to test some software that I wrote.

    Look at this:

    https://forums.opera.com/topic/19476/opera-guide-for-low-end-pcs?p=/topic/19476/opera-guide-for-low-end-pcs

    https://forums.opera.com/topic/23295/opera-memory-consumption-windows

    Maybe helps.

  • zalex108: Thanks for the reply. I skimmed through the links but plan on taking a good look at them later today. This may just be what I need.

  • zalex108: I tried the tweaks suggested to make my old XP machine run the browser faster (that I thought would help)
    and they did. Its not a speed daemon but it runs much more acceptably. Thanks.

  • @jdlomonaco

    Good! 👍

    Try to keep your system defragmented and look for Speed up registry tweaks too.

  • @davehawley i should ask here, and not take a whole question"does Windows 7 have more trouble with the latest Opera?"--which is what I just got.Frankly,i hate windows so much,I am not PLANNING to get a new pc computer,🖥

    I will get a good 'puter grease monkey, and have my old pc upgraded--people do this all the time.--i have seen it work. --very well. --Because my engineer friends who worked for big pc companies, tell me the new pcs are getting WORSE than the old ones.;💣 I can't ruin the last few yrs of my life,(Im 70) struggling with even WORSE PCS than i already have!!I won't do it!!! I have HAD IT. I am a patient long suffering human,but I got few good years left. I'm not wasting it, struggling with rinky-dink pcs. its not WORTH IT.

    You younger people think its fun,but I have SOURED ON THE COMPUTER AS a lifestyle.. its is a TOOL, not a God!! now I only do a few things on mine; watch movies.do email, a little art, and buy stuff. --that is it.--I went back to non-computer hobbies, and i like it.--espec. not befriending people all over the web. Facebook can go jump. I advise this to all seniors. Get yer face outta the screen, and go live.😲 ❤

  • @clarachan1355 said in New Windows XP user - Questions:

    Get yer face outta the screen, and go live.

    XD 👍

  • @clarachan1355 said in New Windows XP user - Questions:

    ...
    I will get a good 'puter grease monkey, and have my old pc upgraded--people do this all the time.--i have seen it work. --very well. --Because my engineer friends who worked for big pc companies, tell me the new pcs are getting WORSE than the old ones.;💣 I can't ruin the last few yrs of my life,(Im 70) struggling with even WORSE PCS than i already have!!I won't do it!!! I have HAD IT.
    ...

    There are some problematic factors to keep in mind when considering investment into upgrading an old PC.

    While a number of things can be upgraded on a truly old computer, depending on age, there are built-in physical limitations that prevent old hardware from being made fully compatible with newer computer standards, at least with any favorable degree of cost-effectiveness. Truly old hardware, while perhaps originally more robust, was designed and built to now-old standards and protocols. These act to limit compatibility and capacity when newer standards and protocols must be utilized to get full computer functionality with modern software and websites. Think in terms of a refurbished car designed to run on leaded gasoline and 10W40 motor oil, but now facing a supply marketplace dominated by unleaded gasoline and 5W30 (or even 0w20 synthetic) motor oil... it can be done, but at what cost and trouble?

    Moreover, with age, some hardware physically deteriorates (fans, hard drives, and power supply or motherboard capacitors being common examples), and these can create weaker performance that causes increasing intermittency and/or startup failures. Many of the computer's hardware parts require software 'driver' programs written by their makers to properly connect the hardware with the operating system installed on the computer. For a lot of older hardware, the hardware makers no longer write updated drivers compatible with requirements of newer operating system software, forcing the user to stick with an old and obsolete operating system. But that, in turn, increasingly blocks a user from using newer application program versions written around newer operating systems, as well as exposing the user to increasing numbers of now-unpatched security exploits out on the Internet.

    In my own experience, some computers can indeed run for 10-20 years or even longer, particularly if well-maintained and with occasional replacement of fans and drives, as well as a new power supply or two. At this moment, I'm sitting next to a fully-functioning Micron Win98FE system dating from 1998 that I still use occasionally to run DOS and very old Windows programs. But that's not to say such old computers will support installation of a modern operating system, and it's not to say the systems would be safe if taken online with their original operating system and compatible software. It's certainly not to say that putting much rebuild money into such an old system could be justified except by a business necessity of running certain ancient business-related programs.

    My advice would be to take a very long, hard look at the cost-return trade-off before putting much into a physical upgrade of an old computer. It might be simpler or more cost effective to get a simple, information-appliance type of small and cheap computer for the usage you have.