Trouble of the Day

  • Without available installation media, they're largely dead in the water if the recovery image(s) on the drive gets trashed, unless they can find somebody else's installation media to borrow, along with remembering their Windows registration number.

    Come again?
    :confused:

    So you're saying, you back up the whole disk?
    What should I use, if any? And how much is it in disk space?

  • The case I was addressing was if the disk or all of the OS's on-drive backups die or are rendered unusable, you have to have a source outside of that drive from which to reinstall the operating system. That means either the original installation CDs/DVDs and the OS registration number or else a full system-grade image file made from the drive earlier and saved somewhere else must be available to the user. While some computers are sold without physical reinstall disks and instead use a special hidden partition on the drive for recovery, the problem there is that if the drive itself fails, usually the backup partition is gone as well, hence a physical copy of the OS is good to have.

    If one uses a full image backup on external media, a user still needs a way to boot the computer and to properly read the file format of that image in order to restore the image to a new or reformatted drive. Most disk imaging programs have built in mechanisms that allow you to create a bootable 'rescue' disk that will let you install that program's image files onto a drive, even if the OS on the drive is rendered unbootable... but you have to create the rescue disk before any problems occur that block access to the imaging program itself on the computer. If reinstalling from OS disks, the first disk in the set will itself be bootable and you simply go from there.

    What one needs for backup is governed by the consequences of the different kinds of possible failures of a computer and software. Eg: the businessman or a user with lots of family photos values his data perhaps more than the computer, so he needs to back that up securely and often, particularly somewhere physically removed from the computer's main drive. In their case, multiple backups are often used: smaller and more frequent ones of just the data files; larger and less frequent ones of the OS, all the apps, and the data files on the drive.

    The user who only browses the Internet has little or no irreplaceable data; everything important to him can be reinstalled from original media or web downloads, though the inconvenience might be great depending on how much there is. The one thing such a user MUST have, however, is a source and mechanism for reinstalling his OS.

    I back up everything about monthly to full-drive images kept on one of two external 2Tb hard-drives which are alternated every couple months and stored off-site. I back up critical data and various settings files daily to a second hard-drive within the system and weekly to an external flash stick stored off-site. I also employ multiple Windows restore files automatically made on my system for OS issues, just in case. The Windows folder on a system for Windows 10 will run to 18-19 Gb on many systems; obviously, the program file folders will be additional, depending on what apps have been installed. As I've noted before, data recovery is critical to me, so I use a 'belt, suspenders, and even a piece of rope' to back things up. Personally, I use a paid version of Paragon for image backups.

  • :faint:

    Tb ... Gb ...

    Terabits? Gigabits?

  • Tb is Terabits. Not to be confused with Lb (lotsa bits). :D

  • Sorry, mixed up the threads. I mean I used to have a "Trouble" for any trouble...
    Move to Chat, please, then...
    :awww:

  • Readmitted to the hospital on the 5th, I was performed with biopsy Tuesday the 10th. Home again, awaiting for the results, to get re-re-admitted for the third time - they're going to scratch my bone in any case, good if no parts removing, yikes. The doctor says when doing the bio, it might not have been resembling the ^bad^ though; however it says in my release paper, the extension seems several centimeters so it might seem I'm up to some pain one way or another.
    He treated my arm very well, however; feeling o'k, much better now.

    I broke the arm in that very place just making an energetic move. A piece of shit of a neighbour from 2 floor had made our house a dove territory - I was upset and moved against one trying to flap IN the building.
    ER took me to the hospital, I waited, then a traumatologist somehow immobilised it with pink gypsum.

    Yep, it's cancer. So that I wouldn't be TOO happy with the pink...

  • About that Windows boot situation, it "behaves" practically every time now. Unless I boot back very soon after shut-down.

    There was a "Samsung" screen offering "Recovery". Well, I tried - did not proceed, because it said I must lose my C.
    I switched off-on a time or two - as I hoped a Windows black screen with booting options: last two times I chose "normal" - it was o'k! :dunno:

  • Mostly browsing with Firefox, I've got a couple of occurrences of this thing in these couple of days. Haven't noticed if it happened only when I use certain sites or do something special or not.

    In the Windows task bar, a task thing appears, with title "Daily News".
    Both times I got it, I tried clicking on it to see WTF was that. But nothing went up. Right-clicking to close it worked.
    The icon in this task thing was not a Firefox one, nor any other I recently used.

    What is that? A virus? Or some "recent feature" of Firefox?
    Or can it be an extension causing it?
    Should I make a screenshot next time? Should I check certain tools in order to find out what's going on before I close it?

  • If it doesn't have a Firefox icon, then it can't be an extension. Extensions do not run outside the browser.

  • ...
    In the Windows task bar, a task thing appears, with title "Daily News".
    Both times I got it, I tried clicking on it to see WTF was that. But nothing went up. Right-clicking to close it worked.
    The icon in this task thing was not a Firefox one, nor any other I recently used.
    ...

    The next time it appears, try right clicking the taskbar icon and selecting Properties, then look at the Target and Start-in boxes that appear in the pop-up. Note: in some Windows versions, you may have to right click the taskbar icon and again right click on the program's name within the taskbar pop-up to get the Properties option to appear. There may be some path information in that Target or Start-in data that gives a clue as to what is originating the taskbar icon.

  • @blackbird71
    Sorry for the delay. I was sick flat and didn't give poop about anything.
    The thing seems to be generated daily by my AV 360. I guess it's all right. Thank you, little bird;)

  • @joshl said in Trouble of the Day:

    ...
    The thing seems to be generated daily by my AV 360. I guess it's all right. ...

    I'm glad you're back! Hopefully, you're feeling better at last.

    Is your identification of 360 as the source of the 'daily news' pop-up based on right-clicking the taskbar icon's Properties? The "target" entry should show you the path to the originating file and what folder it's coming from.

  • @blackbird71 said in Trouble of the Day:

    @joshl said in Trouble of the Day:

    ...
    The thing seems to be generated daily by my AV 360. I guess it's all right. ...

    Is your identification of 360 as the source of the 'daily news' pop-up based on right-clicking the taskbar icon's Properties? The "target" entry should show you the path to the originating file and what folder it's coming from.

    No:) It says "360" etc. in the title bar:lol:

  • @joshl said in Trouble of the Day:

    No:) It says "360" etc. in the title bar:lol:

    Ahh... OK. I don't use 360, so I wasn't aware if they did a 'daily news' thing. However, many AVs indeed do put up an occasional message pop-up with either virus news or weekly/monthly track record of attacks upon the system, so it may simply be in that class of message. Depending on the AV, sometimes a user can suppress such messages if desired, but not all AVs that perform the messaging give a user that option.

  • @blackbird71 The thing doesn't seem very aggressive, however it offers an upgrade to be able to lose ads etc. But it does not appear that annoying as some, so I gratefully decline:)

  • Free AV software will display stuff asking you to upgrade - Avira does that also.

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